These interviews are real. The interviewer is real. The interviewees are real (or extremely elaborate hoaxes). The answers, however, have not been fact checked.


“People’s True Crazy Lives Have Always Been A Source Of Fascination For Me:” A TDQ Q&A With Actress Samantha Stewart

Samantha Stewart

Samantha Stewart looking vibrant. How vibrant you ask? So vibrant we had to turn down the vibrance in Photoshop.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actress Samantha Stewart. Samantha discussed with us her eclectic tastes in movies, her latest movie, “Voodoo” and the sacrifices she makes for her art. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Samantha Stewart: 

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Samantha Stewart: I love the spotlight, and being the center of attention, so it was an easy choice for me! In high school I was voted “Most Talented” and “Least Likely to Work in a Cubicle”. There was just never a doubt in anyone’s mind that I was gonna leave TN asap and go be in show business. I was definitely THAT kid.

TDQ: Who was your favorite actress growing up?

SS: Reese Witherspoon was definitely someone I looked up to. She went to school right down the road from me, and I remember being obsessed with movies like “Cruel Intentions,” “Man in the Moon,” and “Freeway.” Then when “Walk the Line” came out, I basically worshipped her. I thought I would grow up and be her. But instead I turned out to be me, which is different, but no less awesome. :)

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

SS: “Newsies” and “Requiem for a Dream.” Haha! Two polar opposite movies, right? That’s definitely my taste, I love musicals and cute boys dancing, and then I love just really gritty dramas that make you wanna kill yourself :P I was a weird kid!

TDQ: Who are your influences?

SS: My Dad for sure. He is driven by a logical brain, a Type A personality, and a penchant for sticking your foot in your mouth. That’s me for sure, which is interesting ’cause most artists are that creative type, which has never really been me. I’m my own kind of artist. I’m also influenced by some of my favorite singers, like James Taylor and Barbra Streisand and George Michael. I love reading biographies on celebrities I look up to, and figure out how they did it. People’s true crazy lives have always been a source of fascination for me. Oh, and Oprah. She’s the best.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

SS: Ru Paul’s catch phrase “Don’t F— it Up.” I think that just about covers all the bases.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

SS: To wait till I was married to have sex. Thank God I didn’t listen to that one :)

Samantha Stewart, VooDoo

Samantha Stewart cooking in the kitchen with a friend in VooDoo.

TDQ: Tell us about your latest movie, “VooDoo”

SS: I did “Voodoo” over 3 years ago, so it’s crazy it only recently came out! It’s this really effed up portrayal of how bad things can happen to you, even when it’s not your fault haha. My character spends half the movie getting the complete s— beaten out of her, and as an actress in the film, I had a very similar experience. I hope it comes across like a realistic portrayal, ’cause most of the time I wasn’t acting. I was genuinely tired, sick, cold, beaten up, and miserable. All in the name of THE CRAFT. And it was awesome. Gotta love this job!

TDQ: Besides films, you’ve also appeared in soap operas like “Days of Our Lives” and “The Young and the Restless” What’s the biggest difference between working on soaps and working on films?

SS: I talk about this in every interview, but I’ll keep saying it. Soaps are way tougher than anyone gives them credit for. You get one take to nail your lines. They are shooting so quickly, there’s no time to for second chances. And I love that about them. It really helped me learn how to give the best performance I could the first time. It’s an amazing help for auditions too. Films are different, cause you can just always ask for another take if you mess up, or want to try something different. Don’t get me wrong, that’s also equally great, and I’m very grateful when I get opportunities to play around and have fun with a role. That’s harder to do on a soap.

Samantha Stewart, VooDooTDQ: What project are you working on next?

SS: Not sure what will be next, that’s the great thing about the job, is that the opportunities come last minute, and you never know what might be in store for you. I could get an audition tomorrow, and be on a plane for South America next week. But definitely keep an eye out during the commercial breaks for me. I’ve been doing a ton of commercials, and should be all over your TV. :)

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

SS: Pregnant!!! No seriously, I want babies, like, now. I’m turning 30 this year, time to start cranking them out!! ;) My dream life is to have babies with a man I’m obsessed with, who never wants to stop having sex with me, own a bunch of property that keeps the money coming in, travel around the world, and get offers to star in dream projects that win me Oscars, but I still never get recognized on the street so I can continue to go to Chipotle with sweat pants and no make up….. *sigh* That’s the life…..

Follow Samantha on Twitter and check out her website

“I Wanted To Always Be Able To Be A Kid At Heart: A TDQ Q&A With Actress Ruth Reynolds

Ruth Reynolds

It’s Ruth Reynolds, everyone. You can get lost in those eyes. Just stare into them. Nothing jarring is going to happen. Keep staring.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actress Ruth Reynolds. Ruth spoke to us about her latest movie, “Voodoo,” how she got into acting and how she handles bad advice. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Ruth Reynolds: 

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Ruth Reynolds: I loved where your mind got to when watching a movie. You became a part of it. We would re-enact moments from films and TV that we found amusing. I realized as a kid these adults were getting to tell stories and play pretend. I wanted to affect people in the same way when I grew up. I wanted to always be able to be a kid at heart. Show business was perfect for that. 

TDQ: Who was your favorite actress growing up?

RR: I had many actresses I’ve looked up to throughout the years but growing up my favorite was and still is Lucille Ball.

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

RR: It was a tie between “Braveheart” and “Dirty Dancing.”

TDQ: Who are your influences?

RR: Too many to mention. My biggest influence in life would be my siblings. They always taught me that if you love what you do, then you should follow that passion. 

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

RR: Life begins after your comfort zone.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

RR: I don’t believe in bad advice… If someone gives you bad advice then you can question it and realize there is always something to learn and gain from. 

VooDoo

VooDoo is a wholesome family film starring Ruth Reynolds.

TDQ: Tell us about your latest movie, “VooDoo”

RR: Voodoo was a blast to shoot. An amazing cast and crew. It was a cool experience going from the fun loving cousin to a possessed being. Don’t want to give any spoilers away. 

TDQ: What project are you working on next?

RR: I’m in the process of producing and acting in a film called “Walk of Shame” and within the next year will start working on a thriller film called Witchula.

TDQ: What advice would you give to someone who wants to become an actor or actress?

RR: Be yourself, love what you do and don’t give up.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

 RR: Bringing stories to life. 

Be sure and follow Ruth on Twitter and check her out on Instagram

“I Think Juggling Is Something All Moms Learn To Be Good At:” A TDQ Q&A With Entrepreneur Breegan Jane

Breegan Jane

Merriam-Webster defines radiant as: “radiating rays or reflecting beams of light”, “vividly bright and shining : glowing”, and “marked by or expressive of love, confidence, or happiness.” And then they show a picture of Breegan Jane.

This week’s TDQ is with mom, blogger and entrepreneur Breegan Jane. Breegan spoke to us about the hectic life of single moms, how she balances her career and family and how a trip to Europe as a teenager changed her life. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with entrepreneur Breegan Jane: 

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be an entrepreneur?

Breegan Jane: Funny enough, I don’t feel like I chose entrepreneurship. It chose me. It’s in my blood. I talk about my grandmothers and how so many of my relatives were strong female business owners on breeganjaneblog.com, and I really do believe that passion and inclination was passed down to me. For as long I can remember, I was always discovering ways to beautify and resell things, whether it was in high school or for other companies. My heart simply led me to it.

TDQ: Who was your favorite interior designer growing up?

BJ: I don’t know that I had an actual favorite designer growing up, but I do remember having my breath taken away on my first visit to Europe. I was just a teen, but the experience was impactful. We toured a castle and I saw all the intricate, detailed design elements we simply don’t have here in the states. I can remember it like yesterday: the angels painted on walls, hand-carved masterpieces and brocade pieces. The whole adventure left such an impression on me and manifested into a love for museums, older furniture and an eye for artistic qualities in interior design today.

TDQ: Who are your influences today?

BJ: I would say I have many influences, but one who stands out today is designer Joanna Gaines. Ironically, it isn’t necessarily her style that I feel drawn to; instead it’s her business savvy and professionalism. In a very modern world where feminism’s definition is often misconstrued to be one-dimensional, she defies that. She’s married with multiple children, and she balances it all while maintaining an authentic brand. She became successful because she’s good at what she does, she loves it and that’s what people connect to. It’s a true display of women’s empowerment, and that means a lot to me.

Breegan Jane

Breegan Jane on the set of what is obviously a photoshoot for…Wait. I’ve just been told this is a casual family photo.

TDQ: What is the best advice you’ve ever received?

BJ: The best advice would be to believe in yourself and preserve your own sense of reality, because you’re going to be tested and told what you cannot do. You are in charge of your own life and happiness, and you have to work from that place.  Once you can accept that, nothing else matters. You have to make up your mind to work towards what makes you happy, and what will lead to your success. No wavering!

TDQ: What is the worst advice you’ve ever received?

BJ: The worst advice has been to change who I am for the sake of selling something. This industry will tell you that making a financial return is worth sacrificing your true self, reputation, brand and authenticity. It’s sad, really. I’d counter that horrible advice with a simple: “pick the job you love, work hard and stay true to self.” It’s what has gotten me this far.

TDQ: Tell us about the Mom Life Yo app you’ve developed

BJ: When T. Lopez and I began Mom Life Yo, our original intention was to enter the homes of people everywhere and be their virtual friends offering support. We wanted to reach as many moms as possible and push ourselves to talk about the real issues and topics no one else was discussing. What we realized was moms are busy! They can’t always set a time to listen to us because as a mom, you don’t often know what your day is going to bring. With the app, moms can tune in with the touch of a button, anytime they please. The app allows us to work around their schedules instead of requiring them to work with ours.

Breegan Jane, T Lopez, Mom Life Yo

Mom Life, Yo is a one-hour Radio Show created and hosted by multi-talented Supermoms T Lopez and Breegan Jane.

TDQ: Besides being an interior designer and radio host, you also own the LEONA restaurant in Venice Beach, California. How do you manage to juggle all of those things as well as being a single mom?

BJ: I think juggling is something all moms learn to be good at, to be honest. Sometimes our creative endeavors don’t last a lifetime. I birthed a brand and project with my ex-husband, and I’m not sure what the future holds in regards to it right now. I am, however, excited to have extra time to pour into several new ventures and products which are taking shape and being developed. Keep your eyes and ears peeled for unveilings soon!

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

BJ: When I get asked this question, my first thought is often about how old my kids will be. I think a lot about family growth and how that will affect our lives. I feel encouraged and excited because as my children grow older, they become more independent; that only furthers the potential for my career. It means greater yields from my creative and business lives that will push me closer towards what I want to do. I see continual growth. I have no intentions of slowing down, that’s for sure.

Follow Breegan on Twitter and like her Facebook page, too!

“We Want To Make Stuff That You Love Just As Much As Your Kid Does:” A TDQ Q&A With Tami Stronach

Tami Stronach

Tami Stronach

We are really excited about this week’s TDQ Q&A with Tami Stronach. The actress/dancer/singer talks about her family focused entertainment company, Paper Canoe, growing up in the 80s and her role as the Child-like Empress in “The Never Ending Story.” Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Tami Stronach:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Tami Stronach: I was one of those kids who right from the start just wanted to perform. I loved the connection with the audience. It felt like a great thing for me to pour my feelings into something productive. I was also one of those kids who had ‘a lot of feelings.’ So, when you have that combo of sensitive, and also craving the spotlight, you get a performer. Actor, dancer, I really didn’t distinguish. I just knew I wanted to do it.  

TDQ: Who was your favorite musical artist growing up?

TS: When I was little, the Beatles, Simon and Garfunkel. And Abba. When I got a little older David Bowie, Annie Lenox, Bobby McFerrin. Pink Floyd, U2 and Michael Jackson. Pretty normal 80s kid. 

TDQ: What was your favorite fantasy film growing up?

TS: Not sure if it’s quite fantasy, but I loved ‘Brazil.’ Brilliant–Still resonates today.  

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

TS: “Trust your gut.”

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

TS: “Put on a mini skirt and strut around the office”, but a close second for ‘worst’ would be, “Everyone else thinks about it this way so you should too…”

Tami Stronach

Tami Stronach

TDQ: Who are your influences?

TS: Bold visual choices always get me. I love it when the style of a work tells the viewer as much about what is going on in a story as the content. In film anything by Terri Gilliam– I also loved “Blade Runner.” In art I’ve always been drawn to surrealism, Frida Kahlo and the whimsy and romanticism of Chagall. In high school I read everything by Ursula Le Guin, and books like “The Island of Doctor Moreau”.

TDQ: What is your favorite memory of making “The Never Ending Story?”

TS: My favorite memory is when I came into the studio for the first time and saw the set of the ivory tower. It was so beautiful it just swept me into the story.

TDQ: How did you form your family-focused brand, Paper Canoe Company?

TS: Well, when I had my daughter, I think a shift started happening in how I think about stories. For me, having a little girl brought me back to my own childhood. For kids, a story isn’t just a story. The imagination is literally just as important as reality. There is something amazingly joyful about connecting with an audience that actually wants to bring their full selves to the experience. So we started making stories that families can enjoy—and this is the key for us—together. It’s not like, “Oh, here is something for my kid that I’m going to have to put up with.” We want to make stuff that you love just as much as your kid does. That’s the goal. I’m putting 30 years of acting, dancing, teaching, singing, performing, and telling stories into it. It’s always a lot of work to start your own thing, but in the end, it’s the most fulfilling thing you can do. Our creative team is really talented and motivated, so I’m incredibly excited to see what we can make.   

TDQ: Tell us about your newest project, the folk rock opera album, “Beanstalk Jack”

TS: It’s a really fun thing. Jack and the Beanstalk with a girl meets boy twist. Jack’s this kind of silly country boy singer songwriter. He goes up the beanstalk and steals the heart of Harmony, the giant’s daughter who is a rock star in waiting. So he’s a little bit country. She’s a little bit Rock and Roll (I sing that part). The giant’s a greedy big shot meany, so it just worked out that it is kind of a great story for the moment we’re in. Its ridiculously fun, and the music is classic Americana. We’ve had a lot of great reactions to it as we’ve gotten ready for the release on Saturday. 

TDQ: You’re also performing a live theater version of “Beanstalk Jack” this weekend. What can you tell us about that?

TS: Yes this week we get to finally perform it live. We’ll be adding theatrical elements to the show over time as we get a sense for how the audience engages, but this is the official launch party, so we are really excited to play, and we are doing the show in an incredible venue, National Sawdust in Williamsburg. The whole point is to bring families together, to celebrate through music and let the songs get the imagination going. It’s a great ride. There are some tickets still available for Saturday morning, and it’s going to be a blast, so I’m counting on some of those 80s kids to come out and bring the family. 

Follow Tami on Twitter, and head over to the Paper Canoe website. 

“I Find Happiness In Living Moment To Moment:” A TDQ Q&A With Actress And Writer Sonia Rockwell

Sonia Rockwell

Sonia Rockwell

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actress and writer Sonia Rockwell. Sonia spoke to us about her role in the new version of “MacGyver,” her recent work in “The Bounce Back” and how great Mike Judge is. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A With Sonia Rockwell:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Sonia Rockwell: Getting paid to play sounded like the best idea in world! Sign me up!

TDQ: Who was your favorite actress growing up?

SR: I absolutely adore Reese Witherspoon! She can be serious, cute, corky, dorky, and just plain adorable! I have really enjoyed watching her career.

TDQ: What was your favorite TV show growing up?

SR: Honestly, any cartoons. I loved cartoons growing up. I didn’t really watch a lot of regular TV as a kid other than cartoons. Then of course…there were “Friends,” the “X-FILES,” and “MacGyver”!!!

SoniaRockwell in the movie Spread.

Sonia Rockwel in the movie Spread with Ashton Kutcher. You may think this movie is about a guy giving out free samples of a tasty new veggie spread at the grocery store but it is not.


TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

SR: It’s funny, I get asked this question a lot! Live in the moment! Like children, they don’t worry about yesterday or worry about tomorrow, they just enjoy the present. I find happiness in living moment to moment.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

SR: Yikes! The worst advice, hmmm, I can’t remember…maybe I didn’t take it! Haha

TDQ: Who are your influences?

SR: My Mother is my absolute biggest influence. She’s a walking angel, she has more love in one person to give than I have ever seen. Truly a selfless woman, she was a successful Biochemist, and at one time a flight attendant. She is just a big bundle of love. I admire her so much, if I could be half the woman she is I would be proud.

Sonia Rockwell at The Bounce Back premiere.

Sonia Rockwell at The Bounce Back premiere.


TDQ: Tell us about your work on your latest movie, “The Bounce Back” and upcoming series, “American Crime”.

SR: In “The Bounce Back” I play a Chicago talk show host. Shemar Moore and his love interest battle it out in their opposing views of getting over love on my talk show. We had fun with it, and played a lot with improv. It was a lot of fun and we had a lot of surprises. “American Crime” will be airing soon, unfortunately I can’t say too much about it, other than working with Felicity Huffman was an honor.

TDQ: You’ve also appeared on the reboot of “MacGyver.” What was it like working on an updated version of such an iconic show?

SR: Oh my gosh, it was a dream. I actually remember my parents watching the original series, so I was stoked to get to play on it. My character is from Portugal and I got to speak Portuguese and had a real thick Portuguese accent. It was fun working with George Eads again, we did an episode together on “CSI,” playing totally different characters. We had a blast.

Sonia Rockwell and Snoop Dogg

Sonia Rockwell and close personal friend Snoop Dogg.

TDQ: What other projects are you working on next?

SR: I play Jenny McCarthy on Mike Judge’s new show “History of the World…For Now.” It’s pretty silly, you learn about pop culture in an almost “Saturday Night Live Style.” I love comedy, it’s so much fun, and of course, Mike Judge is a legend!

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

SR: In five years I’m still going to be acting on TV and in film and by then I’ll have the TV show I am currently writing finished. It’s a comedy and that will be in the works to make its debut! I’m so excited, I can’t wait, I love writing. And I’ll definitely have my pilots license in the bag, so then, I’ll go flying!

Check out Sonia’s Facebook page and follow her on Twitter.