Frasier’s Dad, John Mahoney Dies At 77

John Mahoney

John Mahoney, right, with actor Richard Dreyfus, center, and RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio, left. DiMaio played the role of an additional aluminum siding salesman in the film Tin Men but the part was later cut because focus groups felt there were one too many aluminum siding salesmen.

Chicago—Actor John Mahoney, best known as Frasier’s former cop pop Martin Crane on the NBC hit “Frasier” from 1993 to 2004, died Sunday after a battle with cancer. He was 77.

Born in Blackpool, Lancashire, England, Mahoney moved to the United States in the 1950s and got his start as an actor when he joined John Malkovich and Gary Sinise in Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre in 1977. He would go on to win a Tony Award for his role in “The House of Blue Leaves.”

On the big screen, he appeared in such films as “Eight Men Out,” “Say Anything…,” “RECOiL” and “The Manhattan Project.”

Besides “Frasier,” he also appeared in TV shows like “Becker,” “Hot in Cleveland,” “ER” and “3rd Rock From the Sun.”

Mahoney never married or had any children. 

Baby, If You’ve Ever Wondered, Wondered Whatever Became of Hugh Wilson, He Died

Hugh Wilson

Hugh WIlson, left, and the cast of WKRP in Cincinnati. RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio was supposed to play the lead role in the series as DJ Jeff Jessica. As luck would have it DiMaio read a Popular Science article just before shooting about the soon to be released Sony Walkman and assumed the cassette tape would mean the down fall of broadcast radio.

Charlottesville, VA— Hugh Wilson, creator of such classic television shows as “WKRP in Cincinnati” and “The Famous Teddy Z,” died on Monday, January 15th, after an illness. He was 84.

Wilson got his start in television writing for “The Bob Newhart Show,” and went on to write for “The Tony Randall Show” and “The Chopped Liver Brothers” before achieving fame with WKRP. He won an Emmy Award for writing on the short-lived CBS sitcom “Frank’s Place” in 1988.

He was also an alumni of the University of Florida School of Journalism, and inspired scores of other Gators to begin websites and aspire to be TV show creators and writers.

On the big screen, he directed and co-wrote “Police Academy,” “Rustlers’ Rhapsody,” “RECOiL” and “Guarding Tess.”

He is survived by his wife, five children and four grandchildren.

“Things take time to develop in this career:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor Donald Paul

Donald Paul

Look to see more of actor Donald Paul in the much anticipated seasons of Atlanta, and Quantico.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actor Donald Paul. Donald spoke to us about his upcoming work on “Quantico” and “Atlanta,” the influence his family had on his career, and how working with special needs children while he was in college impacted his life and career. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Donald Paul:
 
The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?
 
Donald Paul: Growing up, my mother was a Haitian gospel singer that would travel all of south Florida performing in different churches. I would tag along playing the drums for her. That combined with me being in my church’s Christmas play every year, made me realize that I’m comfortable being on stage. I eventually started signing myself up for improv groups in school and, long story short, ended up moving to New York, and here I am today. 
 
TDQ: Who was your favorite actor growing up?
 
DP: My favorite actor growing up and still one of my favorites is Jamie Foxx. His versatility is impeccable. Im big into improv and his work on “In Living Color” back in the days was some of my favorites. I played football growing up as well and when I found out he played quarterback for his high school team in Texas, it let me know as a young artist that it is possible to make that transition from sports to acting.
 
TDQ: What was your favorite TV show growing up?
 
DP: Um… I watched a lot of TV growing up. Looking back on it I’d have to say “Fresh Prince of Bel Air.” That show did a great job of being both funny and delivering a message. “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” also had Will Smith in it. I love Will Smith’s work.
 
Donald Paul - The Fresher Prince

It may be too early to announce because it hasn’t been written, or funded, and we haven’t even talked to Donald about it but…Look for Donald in the upcoming TDQ production “The Fresher Prince”. Imagine if The Fresh Prince was James Bond and I think you know where we’re going with this.

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?
 
DP: “What is yours, is yours. What’s meant for you will be for you and no one else.” Which means to me don’t worry about what others have and/or what you don’t have. Just concentrate on what you have and your skills and what’s meant for you will come to you. 
 
TDQ: What was the worst advice you ever got?
 
DP: “Have kids really early so you guys can hang out at a bar sooner.” At the time of receiving this advice I was a sophomore in college so I did not take this advice with a grain of salt. I was like, “he might have a point.” But looking back on it I think I made the right decision. 
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
DP: My sister and mother hands down were my biggest role models and influencers growing up. Jeannie, my sister and Fleurina, my mother, are the most resilient women you’ll ever meet. They don’t back down to anything and don’t give up on anything. Having them by my side throughout this journey as an actor has been nothing but a gift.
 
TDQ: You’ve appeared in shows like “Boardwalk Empire,” “Blue Bloods” and “Elementary.” What have you learned about the business from working with experienced actors like Tom Selleck, Steve Buscemi and Lucy Liu?
 
DP: Working with those actors thought me how to be a real professional and work ethic. It is easy to get lost in the fun within this industry. There was a lot I didn’t know going into the industry or the set life. All I knew was how to act because of all the training prior to getting my break. So being lucky enough to work in that great company of actors was a gift from God.
 
TDQ: When you were younger, you worked with children with special needs to help pay for college and to study theater. How did that experience help you, whether in acting or just in life in general?
 
DP: Working with those kids matured me and I felt made me a better human. I wouldn’t be here in this position if it wasn’t for those kids. Most important thing I learned was patience. In this career you must have it. I think it is one of the most important attributes to have as an artist, because things take time to develop in this career.
 
TDQ: What project are you working on next?
 
DP: I recently finished filming “Atlanta” on FX, which season 2 is set to premiere March 1st. I am currently working in the season 3 of “Quantico” on ABC. 
 
TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?
 
DP: In five years I see myself still growing and evolving as an actor. Doing more, working more, and putting my best foot forward in the work that I do. 
 
Check out Donald’s Facebook page and follow him on Twitter.

Here We Go, 2018: Jerry Van Dyke Has Died At 86

Jerry Van Dyke

Jerry Van Dyke, right, made a two episode appearance on the Dick Van Dyke show in the role of Stacey Petrie, brother of the starring character Rob Petrie. Young actor Brian DiMaio, left, was hired to play Germaine Petrie, an even younger brother because if Dick had a younger brother on the show Jerry insisted he also have younger brother.

Hot Springs, AR—Jerry Van Dyke, the less-talented, but still beloved younger brother of Dick Van Dyke, died Friday at his ranch. He was 86. His wife said he had been in declining health since a car accident two years prior. 

Best known for his role as Assistant Coach Luther Van Dam on ABC’s “Coach” alongside Craig T. Nelson from 1989 to 1997, Van Dyke also appeared on television in shows like “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “That 70s Show” and “The Amazing Cosmic Awareness of Duffy Moon.” 

On the big screen, he appeared in such films as “McLintock,” “Palm Springs Weekend,” “RECOiL” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father.”

He is survived by his second wife, Shirley and two children. 

 

“I Became Frustrated With The Traditional Voice Teaching Approaches:” A TDQ Q&A With Voice Coach To The Stars Gary Catona

Gary Catona

Come take Gary Catona’s hand and he will take you to a place where your voice is much improved.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with voice coach Gary Catona. Gary spoke to us about his eclectic list of clients, how he became a voice coach and how you can build your ultimate voice. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with voice coach Gary Catona:
 
The Daily Quarterly: Who was your favorite singer growing up and why?
 
Gary Catona: My favorite singer and inspiration was Mario Lanza – the Andrea Bocelli of his day. From my own city Philadelphia, Lanza captivated me with the beauty, energy, and emotion of his voice – still, in my view, the greatest voice America has ever produced and in the top 5 of all time.
 
TDQ: How did you start your career as a voice coach?
 
GC: I became frustrated with the traditional voice teaching approaches and ended up formulating my own system of voice building and realized the revolutionary nature of my system and decided to teach it to the world.
 
Gary Catona and Stevie Wonder

Gary Catona and client Stevie Wonder.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Be honest with your self.
 
TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Go for the money.
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
GC: Enrico Caruso, Friedrich Nietzsche, Muhammad Ali, Shirley MacLaine, Leonardo Da Vinci and many other mentors along the way.
 
Gary Catona and Muhammed Ali

Gary Catona and client Muhammed Ali.

TDQ: Besides singers like Whitney Houston and Steven Tyler, you’ve also worked with boxer Muhammad Ali. What were the different challenges working with someone like that who isn’t a singer? What did you teach him?
 
GC: Ali had a good musical ear so he was able to follow my instruction well. I built back a large percentage of his speaking voice, which was becoming very weak. We worked and traveled together – a monumental episode of my life. There are no real challenges with working with non singers – even pitch issues are not a big deal. 
 
TDQ: Besides talking too much or singing too loudly, what are common everyday things most people do that they wouldn’t think could damage their voice?
 
GC: Talking too much on cell phones while driving or in a loud environment. This causes the person to “compete” – mostly unconsciously – with ambient noise, which could, over time, be harmful.
 
TDQ: Have you ever encountered a client whose voice is just too far gone, or can anybody’s voice be saved or repaired with the proper therapy and work?
 
GC: I have had some voice cases which were too neurologically damaged to help. 
 
Gary Catona's Ultimate Voice Builder

Gary Catona’s Ultimate Voice Builder.

TDQ: Tell us about the Ultimate Voice Builder DVD and why people should grab a copy?
 
GC: Getting the UVB DVD is like having a great cookbook from a famous chef – follow the directions and the results will be excellent. This product is for anyone who would like a much stronger, more attractive singing or speaking voice with increased richness and range. Who doesn’t want that?!
 
Check out Gary’s website and follow him on Twitter.