“We Literally Take Care Of People From Head To Toe:” A TDQ Q&A With Dr. Todd Gravori

Dr. Todd Gavori

Dr. Gravori is a board-certified spine and neurological surgeon who specializes in minimally invasive spine procedures and pain management at ProMedSPINE.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with Dr. Todd Gravori, a spinal surgeon in Los Angeles. Dr. Gravori spoke to us about why he got into medicine, his work with celebrities and the cutting edge technology his practice has developed. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Dr. Todd Gravori:  
 
The Daily Quarterly: In a few short words, what made you want to go into the medical profession?
 
Todd Gravori: I was fascinated with anatomy and how all the organs of the body work together since I was 5 years old. 
 
TDQ: What made you choose to focus on spinal medicine?
 
TG: Spinal problems are very common and severely disabling for people who suffer from them. Treatment of spinal issues, when done for the right reasons and the right way are extremely effective. It is extremely rewarding to return someone’s quality of life to normal in a course of a morning and watch them walk home and pick up their lives where they left them off (before pain).
 
Dr. Todd Gavori

Dr. Todd Gavori in the operating room ready to laser some spines.

TDQ: Are there other doctors or medical professionals in your family?
 
TG: Peyman (my brother who also works at ProMedSPINE) and I are the only doctors in all of our extended family and our generation.
 
TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?
 
TG: Focus on the task at hand until it is COMPLETE.
 
TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?
 
TG: Do what everyone else does and don’t ask questions.
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
TG: I try to observe every single person that I come in contact with and learn from their experience, wisdom, point of view, etc. The most influential people for me are the ones that think outside of the box and identify and solve problems that others simply accept as status quo. 
 
Doctors Peyman and Todd Gavori of ProMedSPINE

Dr. Peyman Gavori, left, and Dr. Todd Gavori, right, and a few of their close personal friends Elton John, Zack Teperman, and Andie MacDowell.

TDQ: Tell us about your practice and areas of specialty at ProMedSPINE
 
TG: At ProMedSPINE we literally take care of people from head to toe. We perform brain surgery, spine surgery, pain management that affects all parts of the body. Of course we focus on the disease of the spine in the office as they are the most disabling for otherwise healthy individuals and affect many lives.
 
TDQ: How did you find yourselves starting to work with so many athletes and Hollywood stars at ProMedSPINE?
 
TG: When you provide the best VIP medical care in the most compassionate way, you find yourselves in the center of the community.  We are blessed and privileged that athletes and many community VIPs trust their most valuable possession (their health) with us. We take that seriously. We take our work and well-being of our patients extremely seriously.
 
TDQ: How have treatments and pain management changed and improved since you first started your practice?
 
TG: We have utilized cutting edge technology and techniques, many of which we have pioneered to advance our methods of treatment. Our scars have become extremely small (in most cases smaller than a dime), our needles are very focused and precise  and our patients leave 1-2 hours after 95% of the procedures we do…..they walk home and get back to work very quickly. The advancements we have made are astonishing.  
 
TDQ: Where do you see ProMedSPINE in the next five years?
 
TG: We intend to reach as many people as we can and touch as many lives as we possibly can and create a positive influence in our world extending from US to Asia  and Africa, which are in progress as we speak.
 
Learn more about Dr. Gravori and ProMedSPINE at their website, and follow the practice on Twitter

“My Team Is The Most Important Part Of My Life And Their Growth Is More Important Than Mine:” A TDQ Q&A With Entrepreneur Jared Goetz

Jared Goetz

Jared Goetz is a young and successful entrepreneur who wants to show you how you can be successful too. (He can’t do anything about your age. Yet.)


This week’s TDQ Q&A is with entrepreneur Jared Goetz. Jared spoke with us about his goals for helping others with his website, why he’s a fan of Mark Cuban and his advice for other would-be entrepreneurs. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Jared Goetz:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you decide to become an entrepreneur?

Jared Goetz: : It came down to my upbringing. I wanted a lot and didn’t have it and knew I needed to get it. No matter what that meant— I knew I had to make massive impacts on the world in order to provide for the people I care about. Honestly, if it wasn’t for the unconditional and insane amount of love for my mother… my motivation levels would be drastically lower. That lady is my driving ‘why’.

TDQ: Who was your favorite entrepreneur growing up?

JG: Mark Cuban. He’s been involved with so many businesses, and just has a calm and collected confidence about him that I admire.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

JG: “It’s only failure if you give up.” My baseball coach said this to me. And when he told us that, it wasn’t just about practicing a swing… it’s about life in general. And yes! I’ve had a lot of ‘learning mistakes,’ but never any failures!

Jared Goetz

Jared Goetz giving instruction for his eCom Hacks Academy, an Online Course and Consulting Firm.


TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

JG: “Stop spending so much time on something you don’t know how to do.” Let’s just say the person who gave me this advice is currently loving their accounting job… I couldn’t imagine that level of complacency. Learning is living and knowledge is power!

TDQ: Who are your influences?

JG: My girlfriend, mom, grandmother and a handful of people I’m blessed enough to consider best friends. The golf course also has a huge influence on me. Oh, and I can’t forget my dog, Nula. She’s a constant reminder to have fun!

TDQ: Tell us about your courses and programs on JaredGoetz.com

JG: We help people out with learning commerce like an expert. We want drop shipping and online businesses to be as trustworthy and professional as possible. By enabling others to work at the highest level… we can really change lives. The best part is building a profitable business like this is an evergreen skillset. The most rewarding part about helping people is the messages and videos I get thanking me for helping them out. The thing is though… none of this change would be happening without committed people ready for growth!

Jared Goetz

Here you might expect us to make a play on words and say something like “Jared Goetz…Whatever Jared wants Jared gets.” But we’re not going to do that. Instead we are going to quote poet lauriate Britney Spears:

“You want a Lamborghini? Sippin’ martinis?
Look hot in a bikini? You better work…”
-B. Spears

TDQ: You’ve been named one of the top entrepreneurs under 30… Does that just confirm how well what you’ve been doing has worked the past couple years, or is it more motivation to stay on top?

JG: It’s definitely humbling, but I really don’t like to compare myself to others, especially by age. I care about making the biggest difference— that’s all.

TDQ: What project or sector are you working on next?

JG: I’m working on a little something that I like to consider revolutionary. Something that I’m not quite ready to share just yet, but I’m so excited to share this project when the world is ready for it! Seriously hoping to change what we know about innovation and advancing society.

TDQ: What advice would you give young entrepreneurs trying to get something started?

JG: This is a super easy answer for a super easy question. Get started. The best advice I can give is to go do that thing you’re planning on doing… stop planning and just do it!

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

JG: I don’t like to think about where I see myself in 5 years as much as I like to think about where do I see the people I surround myself with being in 5 years. I want everyone to eat. My team is the most important part of my life and their growth is more important than mine… if they’re growing, I know I’m doing all right.

Check out Jared on Facebook and follow him on Instagram.

Jared Goetz

At the end of the day it isn’t about the money. It’s about taking care of the people (and dogs) you care about.

“There’s Almost Nothing Like It, When You Get To Do Both. It’s The Ultimate Self-Expression:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor-Musician Aylam Orian

Aylam Orian

Aylam Orian is Cleveland born, Israel raised, and a student of many arts. Aylam has worked behind the scenes, in front of the scenes and, likely, to either side of them. He also is a musician in two musical groups.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with Aylam Orian. Aylam spoke to us about his work on the latest Stargate series Stargate Origins, his inspirations in entertainment and his work in not one, but two bands. Here is our TDQ Q&A with Aylam Orian:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to get into show business?

Aylam Orian: It was a process. I always loved the arts, and loved watching TV shows and films growing up, but I never thought about entering show business as a career and profession. But then while being a psychology student in college, I started working as an usher in an art house cinema, and got to see films in a different way, as an art form, which made me want to learn it myself. So I quit psychology and switched to film school, and liked it so much that I’ve been in this business ever since. Behind the cameras at first, but after trying being in front of them, there was no going back.

TDQ: Who was your favorite actor growing up?

AO: I didn’t have one favorite, but I liked Lee Majors, who played Steve Austin, The Six Million Dollar Man. I liked Jack Lord from Hawaii Five-O, and I liked this British actor, Roy Marsden, who played Detective Dalgliesh in a series of British TV crime shows. Oh, and Christopher Plummer in The Sound of Music!

TDQ: What was your favorite TV show growing up?

AO: Since I grew up on American TV shows (even though I didn’t grow up in the US), I had many favorites, like Steve Austin and Hawaii Five-O as mentioned, or Kojak, Starsky & Hutch, The High Chaparral, The Love Boat, Little House on the Prairie, The Muppets, and many more. But I think my favorite was this puppets scf-fi British show called Thunderbirds, about a family of super heroes who operate all kinds of awesome space crafts in their rescue missions.

Aylam Orian has got range.

Aylam Orian has got range. From a Rabbi in the sitcom 30 Rock to a Stargate hungry Nazi in Stargate Origins.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

AO: In my profession, acting, my influences are great working actors and directors, who have given us some of the most iconic works of art in the film (and now TV too) medium, such as French director François Truffaut, Swedish director Ingmar Bergman, British Director Stephen Frears, American director David Lynch, and actors Peter Sellers (The Pink Panther), Jean Reno (Léon: The Professional), Mads Mikkelsen (Open Hearts), Dustin Hoffman and Jon Voight (Midnight Cowboy), Al Pacino (Scent of a Woman), Daniel Day Lewis (Phantom Thread) and Live Schreiber (Ray Donovan), to name a few.

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?

AO: It’s not an advice that I’ve gotten personally, but one that I heard, said by Steve Martin actually: “whatever makes you unique as a performer – do it! And know that there’s room for you!”

TDQ: What was the worst advice you ever got?

AO: “Don’t move to Los Angeles, you’re too old.”

Stargate Origins - Connor Trinneer, Ellie Gall and Aylam Orian (photo by Joe Adams)

Aylam Orian on the set of Stargate Origins with cast memebers Connor Trinneer and Ellie Gall. (photo by Joe Adams)

TDQ: Tell us about your role on the latest Stargate installment, Stargate Origins

AO: I play the show’s villain, Dr. Wilhelm Brücke, a high-ranking Nazi officer, who is an expert in the occult and the paranormal, and who is obsessed with the Stargate and tries to harness its power for his own megalomaniac plan. I am butting heads throughout the show with the “good guys” – Catherine Langford and her father Professor Paul Langford (from the original Stargate movie!), who are trying to save the Stargate, and the world, from me!

TDQ: You’re also a musician, playing guitar in the bands The Historians and The Ellermans. How does working in front of a camera compare to writing and performing your own music?

AO: Well the performing part in both of them is kinda the same. It’s you standing there in front of an audience or a camera, and giving your version of something that you, or someone else wrote. You are bringing something to life, giving it interpretation, in the moment, using your instrument, be it your body or a musical instrument attached to your body. But the writing-your-own-material part is of course an extra level of excitement! There’s almost nothing like it, when you get to do both. It’s the ultimate self-expression.

TDQ: What project will you be working on next?

AO: Ha, that’s a good question! Still looking for it! Haha… but in August comes out a film I worked on last year, the thriller “Three Seconds” starring Joel Kinnaman, Clive Owen, Rosamund Pike and Common. Should be fun!

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

AO: In a big mansion in Beverly Hills! Just kidding… I hope to be playing a lead role on a good show, for several seasons, perhaps a show I wrote myself (talking about writing your own material!). That would be very fulfilling and nice!

Follow Aylam on Twitter and check out his website.

Aylam Orian - Thunderbirds

TDQ Pictures is pleased to announce that work has begun on a new live action Thnderbirds series featuring Aylam Orian as pilot Virgil Tracy. The series is caught in a bit of a snag in the early stages of production: Specifically how to hide the wires on the live action marionettes. But as soon as this technical difficulty is overcome and a script is written the series will be forthcoming.

“Things take time to develop in this career:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor Donald Paul

Donald Paul

Look to see more of actor Donald Paul in the much anticipated seasons of Atlanta, and Quantico.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actor Donald Paul. Donald spoke to us about his upcoming work on “Quantico” and “Atlanta,” the influence his family had on his career, and how working with special needs children while he was in college impacted his life and career. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Donald Paul:
 
The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?
 
Donald Paul: Growing up, my mother was a Haitian gospel singer that would travel all of south Florida performing in different churches. I would tag along playing the drums for her. That combined with me being in my church’s Christmas play every year, made me realize that I’m comfortable being on stage. I eventually started signing myself up for improv groups in school and, long story short, ended up moving to New York, and here I am today. 
 
TDQ: Who was your favorite actor growing up?
 
DP: My favorite actor growing up and still one of my favorites is Jamie Foxx. His versatility is impeccable. Im big into improv and his work on “In Living Color” back in the days was some of my favorites. I played football growing up as well and when I found out he played quarterback for his high school team in Texas, it let me know as a young artist that it is possible to make that transition from sports to acting.
 
TDQ: What was your favorite TV show growing up?
 
DP: Um… I watched a lot of TV growing up. Looking back on it I’d have to say “Fresh Prince of Bel Air.” That show did a great job of being both funny and delivering a message. “Fresh Prince of Bel Air” also had Will Smith in it. I love Will Smith’s work.
 
Donald Paul - The Fresher Prince

It may be too early to announce because it hasn’t been written, or funded, and we haven’t even talked to Donald about it but…Look for Donald in the upcoming TDQ production “The Fresher Prince”. Imagine if The Fresh Prince was James Bond and I think you know where we’re going with this.

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?
 
DP: “What is yours, is yours. What’s meant for you will be for you and no one else.” Which means to me don’t worry about what others have and/or what you don’t have. Just concentrate on what you have and your skills and what’s meant for you will come to you. 
 
TDQ: What was the worst advice you ever got?
 
DP: “Have kids really early so you guys can hang out at a bar sooner.” At the time of receiving this advice I was a sophomore in college so I did not take this advice with a grain of salt. I was like, “he might have a point.” But looking back on it I think I made the right decision. 
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
DP: My sister and mother hands down were my biggest role models and influencers growing up. Jeannie, my sister and Fleurina, my mother, are the most resilient women you’ll ever meet. They don’t back down to anything and don’t give up on anything. Having them by my side throughout this journey as an actor has been nothing but a gift.
 
TDQ: You’ve appeared in shows like “Boardwalk Empire,” “Blue Bloods” and “Elementary.” What have you learned about the business from working with experienced actors like Tom Selleck, Steve Buscemi and Lucy Liu?
 
DP: Working with those actors thought me how to be a real professional and work ethic. It is easy to get lost in the fun within this industry. There was a lot I didn’t know going into the industry or the set life. All I knew was how to act because of all the training prior to getting my break. So being lucky enough to work in that great company of actors was a gift from God.
 
TDQ: When you were younger, you worked with children with special needs to help pay for college and to study theater. How did that experience help you, whether in acting or just in life in general?
 
DP: Working with those kids matured me and I felt made me a better human. I wouldn’t be here in this position if it wasn’t for those kids. Most important thing I learned was patience. In this career you must have it. I think it is one of the most important attributes to have as an artist, because things take time to develop in this career.
 
TDQ: What project are you working on next?
 
DP: I recently finished filming “Atlanta” on FX, which season 2 is set to premiere March 1st. I am currently working in the season 3 of “Quantico” on ABC. 
 
TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?
 
DP: In five years I see myself still growing and evolving as an actor. Doing more, working more, and putting my best foot forward in the work that I do. 
 
Check out Donald’s Facebook page and follow him on Twitter.

“I Became Frustrated With The Traditional Voice Teaching Approaches:” A TDQ Q&A With Voice Coach To The Stars Gary Catona

Gary Catona

Come take Gary Catona’s hand and he will take you to a place where your voice is much improved.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with voice coach Gary Catona. Gary spoke to us about his eclectic list of clients, how he became a voice coach and how you can build your ultimate voice. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with voice coach Gary Catona:
 
The Daily Quarterly: Who was your favorite singer growing up and why?
 
Gary Catona: My favorite singer and inspiration was Mario Lanza – the Andrea Bocelli of his day. From my own city Philadelphia, Lanza captivated me with the beauty, energy, and emotion of his voice – still, in my view, the greatest voice America has ever produced and in the top 5 of all time.
 
TDQ: How did you start your career as a voice coach?
 
GC: I became frustrated with the traditional voice teaching approaches and ended up formulating my own system of voice building and realized the revolutionary nature of my system and decided to teach it to the world.
 
Gary Catona and Stevie Wonder

Gary Catona and client Stevie Wonder.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Be honest with your self.
 
TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Go for the money.
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
GC: Enrico Caruso, Friedrich Nietzsche, Muhammad Ali, Shirley MacLaine, Leonardo Da Vinci and many other mentors along the way.
 
Gary Catona and Muhammed Ali

Gary Catona and client Muhammed Ali.

TDQ: Besides singers like Whitney Houston and Steven Tyler, you’ve also worked with boxer Muhammad Ali. What were the different challenges working with someone like that who isn’t a singer? What did you teach him?
 
GC: Ali had a good musical ear so he was able to follow my instruction well. I built back a large percentage of his speaking voice, which was becoming very weak. We worked and traveled together – a monumental episode of my life. There are no real challenges with working with non singers – even pitch issues are not a big deal. 
 
TDQ: Besides talking too much or singing too loudly, what are common everyday things most people do that they wouldn’t think could damage their voice?
 
GC: Talking too much on cell phones while driving or in a loud environment. This causes the person to “compete” – mostly unconsciously – with ambient noise, which could, over time, be harmful.
 
TDQ: Have you ever encountered a client whose voice is just too far gone, or can anybody’s voice be saved or repaired with the proper therapy and work?
 
GC: I have had some voice cases which were too neurologically damaged to help. 
 
Gary Catona's Ultimate Voice Builder

Gary Catona’s Ultimate Voice Builder.

TDQ: Tell us about the Ultimate Voice Builder DVD and why people should grab a copy?
 
GC: Getting the UVB DVD is like having a great cookbook from a famous chef – follow the directions and the results will be excellent. This product is for anyone who would like a much stronger, more attractive singing or speaking voice with increased richness and range. Who doesn’t want that?!
 
Check out Gary’s website and follow him on Twitter.