Frasier’s Dad, John Mahoney Dies At 77

John Mahoney

John Mahoney, right, with actor Richard Dreyfus, center, and RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio, left. DiMaio played the role of an additional aluminum siding salesman in the film Tin Men but the part was later cut because focus groups felt there were one too many aluminum siding salesmen.

Chicago—Actor John Mahoney, best known as Frasier’s former cop pop Martin Crane on the NBC hit “Frasier” from 1993 to 2004, died Sunday after a battle with cancer. He was 77.

Born in Blackpool, Lancashire, England, Mahoney moved to the United States in the 1950s and got his start as an actor when he joined John Malkovich and Gary Sinise in Chicago’s Steppenwolf Theatre in 1977. He would go on to win a Tony Award for his role in “The House of Blue Leaves.”

On the big screen, he appeared in such films as “Eight Men Out,” “Say Anything…,” “RECOiL” and “The Manhattan Project.”

Besides “Frasier,” he also appeared in TV shows like “Becker,” “Hot in Cleveland,” “ER” and “3rd Rock From the Sun.”

Mahoney never married or had any children. 

Baby, If You’ve Ever Wondered, Wondered Whatever Became of Hugh Wilson, He Died

Hugh Wilson

Hugh WIlson, left, and the cast of WKRP in Cincinnati. RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio was supposed to play the lead role in the series as DJ Jeff Jessica. As luck would have it DiMaio read a Popular Science article just before shooting about the soon to be released Sony Walkman and assumed the cassette tape would mean the down fall of broadcast radio.

Charlottesville, VA— Hugh Wilson, creator of such classic television shows as “WKRP in Cincinnati” and “The Famous Teddy Z,” died on Monday, January 15th, after an illness. He was 84.

Wilson got his start in television writing for “The Bob Newhart Show,” and went on to write for “The Tony Randall Show” and “The Chopped Liver Brothers” before achieving fame with WKRP. He won an Emmy Award for writing on the short-lived CBS sitcom “Frank’s Place” in 1988.

He was also an alumni of the University of Florida School of Journalism, and inspired scores of other Gators to begin websites and aspire to be TV show creators and writers.

On the big screen, he directed and co-wrote “Police Academy,” “Rustlers’ Rhapsody,” “RECOiL” and “Guarding Tess.”

He is survived by his wife, five children and four grandchildren.

Here We Go, 2018: Jerry Van Dyke Has Died At 86

Jerry Van Dyke

Jerry Van Dyke, right, made a two episode appearance on the Dick Van Dyke show in the role of Stacey Petrie, brother of the starring character Rob Petrie. Young actor Brian DiMaio, left, was hired to play Germaine Petrie, an even younger brother because if Dick had a younger brother on the show Jerry insisted he also have younger brother.

Hot Springs, AR—Jerry Van Dyke, the less-talented, but still beloved younger brother of Dick Van Dyke, died Friday at his ranch. He was 86. His wife said he had been in declining health since a car accident two years prior. 

Best known for his role as Assistant Coach Luther Van Dam on ABC’s “Coach” alongside Craig T. Nelson from 1989 to 1997, Van Dyke also appeared on television in shows like “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” “That 70s Show” and “The Amazing Cosmic Awareness of Duffy Moon.” 

On the big screen, he appeared in such films as “McLintock,” “Palm Springs Weekend,” “RECOiL” and “The Courtship of Eddie’s Father.”

He is survived by his second wife, Shirley and two children. 

 

Now We’ll Never Know If Higgins Was Really Robin Masters: John Hillerman Has Died At 84

John Hillerman

John Hillerman, right, met RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio, left on the set of the 1990 British made-for-television mystery film Hands of a Murderer. As far as the two of them knew up until to day of shooting the pilot DiMaio was to play Sherlock Holmes to Hillerman’s Doctor Watson. At the last moment the gaslighting of Hillerman by director/prankster Stuart Orme was revealed: the role of Holmes was to be played by renown British actor Edward Woodward and not DiMaio. Hillerman expressed great relief saying DiMaio had the worst British accent he had ever heard.

Houston—Actor John Hillman, best known for his fantastic portrayal of estate manager and Doberman Pinscher owner Jonathan Quayle Higgins on “Magnum, P.I.” from 1980 to 1988 (documented as one of the very few television shows that never jumped the shark), died last week. He was 84.

He won both an Emmy Award and a Golden Globe for playing Higgins. He also appeared in such TV shows as “Wonder Woman,” “Hawaii Five-O” and “The Bob Crane Show.”

In the big screen, Hillerman appeared in the films “They Call Me Mister Tibbs!” “Blazing Saddles,” “RECOiL” and “A Very Brady Sequel.”

He is survived by one sister.

Butler-Turned-Governor-Turned-Baboon Voice-Turned TV Exec Robert Guillaume Has Died

Robert Guillaume

Robert Guillaume, center, seen receiving an Emmy award for his Benson character on the show Soap presented by Loni Anderson, left, and RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio, left.

Los Angeles— Actor Robert Guillaume died at his home last Tuesday at the age of 89. He died from complications from prostate cancer, which he had been fighting for 25 years. 

Best known for his Emmy-award winning work playing Benson DuBois, first on “Soap” in the late 1970s, then on his own series, “Benson,” which ran from 1979 to 1986, Guillaume also appeared in such TV shows as “Sports Night,” and “The Robert Guillaume Show.” 

On the big screen, Guillaume was in such films as “Lean on Me,” “The Lion King” as the voice of Rafiki, “RECOiL” and “Big Fish.”

He is survived by his second wife, Donna, three daughters and one son. He had one other son who died in 1990.