Tim Burton, Robert Rodriguez And Quentin Tarantino To Collaborate On Christmas Horror Flick

Unnamed Burton Rodrigues Tarantino Christmas Horror Film

We are unsure how early or late in the process this mock up promotional material was made in the production of Unnamed Burton Rodrigues Tarantino Christmas Horror Film but we can’t wait to see it.

Hollywood—Sources confirmed yesterday, after weeks of speculation, that quirky filmmakers Tim Burton, Quentin Tarantino and Tarantino’s pal Robert Rodriguez have gotten the green light to begin work on a Christmas-themed thriller/horror movie set to hit theaters next holiday season.

“It’s been the worst kept secret in LA the past few months,” said a spokesperson for Sony Pictures, who will be producing the as-yet-titled film. “But we can finally say with great excitement and anticipation that these three geniuses are set to start filming next month.”

While the exact plot of the flick has not been confirmed, a source close to the project said that “it will most definitely contain elements that all three are known for, including Johnny Depp, an unorthodox, non-linear plot with shady characters and kids that spy.” Rumors have been flying around Hollywood that the film will have slasher zombie snowmen, possibly snow vampires, or a plot line involving a haunted and abandoned mental institution at Christmas time.

“There just aren’t enough Christmas horror movies out there,” the Sony spokesman said, “and the genre is especially sorely lacking from not having the finger prints of these great filmmakers on them.”

The studio confirmed that Depp had been cast in the film, but would not say whether he was playing a demented Santa Claus, a weird knock off on Scrooge or some other sort of malevolent psychopath out to destroy the holiday and anyone who celebrates it. Helena Bonham Carter has also been cast, as well as Christoph Waltz, Emily Osment and Tim Roth.

“While these filmmakers certainly appreciate the great plot and storytelling in such classic holiday slasher films as ‘Silent Night, Deadly Night,’ ‘Silent Night, Deadly Night 4: Initiation’ and the vastly underrated ‘Silent Night, Deadly Night 5: the Toy Maker,’ they just felt the time was right for them to put their own twisted touch on the holiday horror film genre,” the spokesman said. “And we can’t wait to see how they raise the bar with this film, which we are really hoping will be the first in a franchise that Robert Rodriguez can then run with and over-saturate the nation with until the last three or four in the series eventually and inevitably can be direct-to-video releases, or available only on Netflix.”

 

“Do Not Wait Around For People To Make Your Dreams Come True – Go Off And Do It On Your Own:” A TDQ Q&A Filmmaker With Dave Zani

David Zani

David Zani

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with producer/director/writer Dave Zani. Dave spoke to us about the inspiration of growing up in the 1990s, being an amateur archaeologist and learning about show business from “Homicide: Life on the Streets”, “The Wire” and “Law & Order SVU” star Richard Belzer. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Dave Zani:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to get into show business?

Dave Zani: I always loved movies and animation but I think that true moment it clicked for me when I was very young, maybe 4th grade. My parents took me on a family vacation to Disney World and Universal Studios in Orlando. It was the first time I had gone to the Universal theme park and back then, in 1994, they still had a lot of classic rides like the original King Kong ride with a giant animatronic ape! This blew my mind, I remember being stunned by it all. At the gift shop I bought some foam bricks – props. I was fascinated with this concept – fake things that seem real for the purpose of entertainment. That was a light-bulb moment that changed my life forever.

TDQ: What was your favorite sic-fi/horror movie growing up?

DZ: As a kid growing up, “Star Wars” – hands down. I was a kid in the mid 90’s , a dark time for Star Wars fans. It was in between “Jedi” and Episode 1, the stores literally had no Star Wars toys or anything. I had VHS tapes of the 3 original movies, the original cuts! I watched these over and over again until the tracking lines in the tape became too much to see past. I use to paint my other action figures to represent Star Wars characters since no toys were on the market then. I often think about how lucky a 10 year-old is right now, the Star Wars world is their oyster, hahaha. In high school, my friends and I got really into “Alien” and “Aliens.” The tone of the film was something that was another wonderful memory discovering.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

DZ: Since I was very young I always admired Walt Disney and Jim Henson, mostly because my mom adored them and their work. Later on, George Lucas and Steven Spielberg, of course. Any kid growing up in my time would say the same, I think. As I grew older my scope and tastes began to vary with people like Roger Corman, Mike Judge, Jim Wynorski, Quentin Tarantino, Tyler Perry, Paul Hertzberg, Samuel Arkoff. I am fascinated by many different types of film and filmmakers. Things you would think are not on my list, I might be a big fan of because I enjoy and respect the process the filmmaker developed.

David Zani's Work

When you look back on things what are you going to see? Did you work on your dream projects? It sure looks like David Zani is.

TDQ: What is the best advice you’ve ever gotten?

DZ: I hear the same advice from people – they either say it directly to me or I hear other people say it in interviews and speeches. Do not wait around for people to make your dreams come true – go off and do it on your own. I believe this statement like it is a religion.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you’ve ever gotten?

DZ: Great question! I was once told to keep my “stupid ideas” to myself. I made sure to never do that!

TDQ: You’re also a member of the American Society for Amateur Archaeology. How does producing a movie compare to finding a rare historical artifact on a dig in some desert?

DZ: Film making is fun, it is a fulfilling career. I love to tell stories and entertain people but I think uncovering artifacts and stepping in the footprints of people from long ago is the most magical thing and lifts my spirits to very high places because it is true adventure. It does not include much stress (for me). I am not true scientist, of course, dealing with the politics of it all (which I am sure is very stressful). I often think about the moment that Howard Carter opened the door to King Tut’s chamber for the first time in 5,000 years. To see things no one has laid eyes on in that amount of time – just sitting there as the days passed, remarkable to think about.

TDQ: You’ve also worked with Richard Belzer, developing content for his website and his production company. What did you learn from working with him?

DZ: I loved working with Richard. He is a great comedic talent with outrageous vision and wit. It was one of the first times I was really working with someone who was well known. I was young and nervous at first, but he was so humble and funny it was easy to create cool work. On the smaller scale of things, I learned timing from Richard, the importance of it and the basics of developing good timing. On a larger scale, I think just learning about him and his career and all the different projects he has worked on, really showed me that you can go anywhere in this world.

TDQ: What project are you working on next?

DZ: Right now I am working on something really special. It is more mainstream, animated and has a rich story, for which I am very proud! It is an epic mythology I am creating, with my own modern twist. I will have more to say soon! To keep in the loop my website OldMillEntertainment.com will have updates in time.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself and Old Mill Entertainment in five years?

DZ: I believe that we will continue to expand our horizons and to continue developing projects that increase in sophistication and audience reach. I am fascinated with the mixing of genres to create new and fresh things, I am fascinated with history and the story of people on Earth – this is the foundation of my work. As I continue to learn more about my interests I will continue to create new stories and characters that people can relate to, be inspired by and be entertained with.

Be sure and follow Dave on Twitter and on Instagram.

TDQ Top Ten List: Top Ten Films That Were Totally Not Worth The Hype

admitnoneWe made the mistake recently of watching “The Deer Hunter” after years and years of hearing how great a movie it was. De Niro, Streep, Oscar for Christopher Walken, it had to be great, right? Wrong. Thus, we were inspired to come up with this list, the Top Ten movies that were not nearly as good as the critics would make you believe. Save yourselves the time and take the advice of this list, not another list compiled by an overpaid film critic. You’re welcome.

1)  “The (aforementioned) Deer Hunter”- The wedding and reception portions of this film took longer than my wedding and a good chunk of my honeymoon. Performances were decent, but get to the point, already.

2) “Django Unchained”- We love Tarantino, and that Austrian guy was really good, but this is another example of a movie being at least a half hour too long.

3) “The Big Lebowski”- Not a fan of dream sequences in most films, and dream sequences in bowling alleys are even worse. Unfunny, unentertaining and a waste of Jeff Bridges’ talent altogether.

4) “Blade Runner”- Sorry Harrison Ford fans, but he set the bar so high with “Raiders of the Lost Ark” that it was a total shame that he made this overhyped mess. By far his worst science fiction flick, and maybe his worst movie not co-starring Anne Heche.

5) “Argo”- Don’t feel bad for Ben Affleck boys and girls. He still got his Oscar when this 2 1/2 hour remake of The Beastie Boys “Sabotage” video won Best Picture.
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The Kid Stays In The Picture: A TDQ Q&A With Filmmaker Bryan Smith Of “8th Avenue Studios,” Part 2

The Fire Project, 8th Avenue Studios

The Fire Project, 8th Avenue Studios

Here is Part 2 of our TDQ Q&A with filmmaker Bryan Smith:

Read Part 1

TDQ: Apart from the lack of a hundred million dollars or so from a huge studio, what’s been the biggest challenge you’ve faced with “The Fire Project” so far?

Smith: Honestly the biggest challenge with this, or any micro-budget project for that matter, is getting people to take you seriously. Unfortunately, without a multi-million dollar budget, a lot of folks think you’re just “jerking around with a camera.” Luckily, I have a great crew, a supportive family and friends who are willing to act for free. Oh yeah, and trying to manage a shoot schedule with a full time job and two kids under age five makes it tough, too. Continue reading

The Kid Stays In The Picture: A TDQ Q&A With Filmmaker Bryan Smith Of “8th Avenue Studios”

8th Avenue Studios

8th Avenue Studios

This week, The Daily Quarterly spoke to filmmaker Bryan Smith of “8th Avenue Studios.” He talked to us about his upcoming web series, “The Fire Project,” which premieres next month, as well as the struggles of being a small studio and the merits of James Cameron’s films. He also talks about Vikings and the fact that Han Solo did, indeed, shoot first. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Bryan Smith:
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