Peter Dinklage To Play E.T. In Reboot Planned For 2020

Peter Dinklage as ET

We have been told that, despite what we see in this pre-production spy shot, the final costume will use practical effects almost entirely. All other scenery and set work will be computer generated. A spokesperson from Mr. Dinklage’s team says the studio has assured them the final costume will be tasteful.

Los Angeles— Fans of the HBO mega-hit “Game of Thrones” finally now know what the show’s creators as well as its biggest star will be doing once the show finishes its 8th and final season in 2019.  

D.B. Weiss and partner David Benioff announced yesterday that they’ve been given the green light to reboot Steven Spielberg’s alien epic, “E.T.” And they will working with an actor for the role that they’ve become very familiar and friendly with the past few years: Peter Dinklage.

“We-I’d guess we probably talked about using CGI for ‘E.T.’ for maybe 10 seconds,” Weiss said. “But then we figured we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to use Pete if we could get him. And we did. He said he’s all in. And we all know he’ll be great.”

The duo were also thrilled to get the blessing of Spielberg himself. “Ste-Mr. Spielberg, excuse me, called us up while we were filming in Malta last week and said he’s excited to see the new twist we would bring to the story,” Benioff said. 

A reboot has been in the Hollywood rumor mill for years, with every well-known director from J.J. Abrams to Bryan Singer to Jon Favreau attached at different times. But Weiss and Benioff said their great chemistry and the timing of them finally finishing up “Game of Thrones” just worked out wonderfully. “The stars just aligned, as it were,” Benioff said.

Other roles in the reboot that have been cast besides Dinklage include Giselle Eisenberg as young Gert, the loudmouthed little sister played by Drew Barrymore in the original; Nancy Travis as the mom originally played by Dee Wallace Stone; Jacob McCarthy as Michael, the older brother played by Robert MacNaughton originally; and Gaten Matarazzo as Elliot, the boy who finds and befriends “E.T.” 

Weiss confirmed that filming would begin on “E.T.” in Majorca shortly after they finished editing the final season of “Game of Thrones,” and he was excited to show how “E.T.” would interact with modern-day society “with all its dragons, magic, corruption and frozen walking zombies, then use an iPad to phone home. It’ll be great.”

“If That Meant I Needed To Swallow Humble Pie, I Imagined It Was Cherry Pie:” A TDQ Q&A With Actress And Writer Chuti Tiu

Chuti Tiu

Look for Chuti Tiu playing the role of character Yo-Yo’s Ma’ in The Internship.

This week, our TDQ Q&A is with actress and writer Chuti Tiu. Chuti spoke with us about her role in “The Internship,” what it was like making a movie with her husband as her director and being Miss Illinois. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Chuti Tiu:

The Daily Quarterly: Who was your favorite actress growing up?

Chuti Tiu: Jaclyn Smith! I loved “Charlie’s Angels,” and I wanted so badly to be Kelly. Seriously – the HAIR. I still love long curly hair…. I remember the episode where she went undercover as a belly dancer. It inspired my Halloween costume one year.

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

CT: E.T.! “E.T. phone home!” I cried and laughed so hard, all in the same movie. I’ve always loved movies that move you on a visceral level. I also loved “The Muppet Movie.” I was such a sap (still am) – I cried during the very first scene, Kermit’s “Rainbow Connection.” I was just a little kid, but the song made me feel so lonely; it spoke to me of the impermanence of life.

TDQ: What made you want to be in show business?

CT: I love rejection. Ha! just kidding. I love the craft of acting, of helping a story get told, portraying someone’s journey and eventually moving and inspiring others. Basically, stories in visual form (film, television, computer, or stage) hold up a mirror to the audience; through the story, they can hopefully see something in themselves revealed… I want to be that “mirror.”
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“I Never Paid Attention To The Extras Until I Was One:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor Jesse Heiman

Jesse Heiman

Jesse Heiman

You may not know it, but you’ve seen this week’s TDQ Q&A subject in damn near everything on TV and in movies. Known as “The World’s Greatest Extra,” Jesse Heiman somehow made time for us to talk about a typical week working all over Hollywood, why he looked up to Michael J. Fox and his thoughts on Will Ferrell’s future in Hollywood. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Jesse Heiman:

The Daily Quarterly: How did you hear about thedailyquarterly.com?

Jesse Heiman: Well, to be honest I had never heard of this site prior to this interview. But I’ve checked it out and it’s a good read.
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“Every Now And Then, We Re-enact The Dead Body Scene From ‘Stand By Me’ At The Park:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor Chad Jamian Williams

Beverly Hills Cop

Chad Jamian Williams teams up with his favorite actor Jaleel White in an artist's impression of what would be an awesome movie.

This week, The Daily Quarterly spoke to actor and Coke Zero spokesdrinker Chad Jamian Williams. Chad gave us the skinny on David Boreanaz, has some advice for aspiring actors aaaaaaand addresses the rumors about his involvement in “Goonies 2.” Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Chad Jamian Williams:

The Daily Quarterly: How did you hear about thedailyquarterly.com?

Chad Jamian Williams: Through the ad you guys stuck on my windshield that rain and heat has prevented me from removing.

TDQ: How excited were you that The Daily Quarterly asked you for an interview?

CJW: So excited that I skipped “The Talk” to be with you guys today.

TDQ: What made you want to be in show business?

CJW: Believe it or not, mostly by watching Michael Jackson videos. When I was eight years old, I was acting a’fool in the backseat of my parent’s car, so they purchased me Michael Jackson’s Dangerous cassette. So, instead of sports or normal eight-year-old stuff, I just watched his movies and listened to his music. And that eventually brought me out to Hollywood. Think of the beginning of “The Jerk.” Continue reading