Four Years And Counting, People

Four Years of The Daily Quarterly

Four Years of The Daily Quarterly.

February 11, 2011: A day which will live in awesomeness. It’s been four years, people, four years since we first informed you and stressed that you should do likewise. Four years of exposing the ridiculousness rampant in Karlsfield, Vermont; four years of bringing you the hard-hitting interviews that Diane Sawyer only wished she could land and four years of touting how amazingly hot Canadian women are.

Since we started this site, we’ve written our first book, shown CNN to be the terribly unprofessional, hack journalists they are and started the ball rolling on getting Brian Williams ousted over at NBC.

And the future looks even brighter. We can’t yet comment on “Harnessing the Power of Spite to Achieve Your Goals” being optioned as movie, but if the big-screen adaptation of “Fifty Shades of Gray” is as big a sensation as they expect it to be, then there’s a good chance our little gift to literature will be box-office gold.

We know plenty of you want to send us gifts for this momentous day, but please, know: the mere fact that you still take 10 or 15 minutes three to eight times a day to read our site, and click on every single one of our ads on here, that is gift enough.

And re-tweeting all of our witticisms is just icing on the cake.

We’ll keep giving you the terrific interviews you’ve come to expect, and we’ve got plenty more big-name, pompous anchor jack-asses both on cable and network TV that we can take down a rung or two. There is absolutely no shortage of those.

Plus, the elections are just now getting revved up, so there will be plenty of political commentary and punditry we will be bringing you that you know us so well for. Don’t worry, this fifth year has a good chance to be our best one yet. At least until the next year.

You are now informed. Go and do likewise. Continue reading

When Network Anchors Fall In The Woods, Do They Make A Sound?

Anchor Swap

Anchor Swap is not a new FOX series but, rather, the result of a bet between two network executives.

New York—If you tuned in last night to watch the “NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams,” or “ABC World News with Diane Sawyer,” you might have thought you were on the wrong channel. Or, more likely than not, you might not have noticed anything at all.

National nightly news anchors Diane Sawyer and Brian Williams switched networks last night, but polls conducted today showed that, remarkably, only 12% of the viewing public noticed. 

Sawyer and Williams, who agreed to the switch only after being assured their pay would not reflect a personal day off, used the regular reporting staff of the respective network. Some reports have said that some of the field reporters didn’t notice the change, either. ABC News correspondent David Kerley called Williams “Diane” three times on camera last night.

Producers for both programs confirmed the one-time switch, explaining that Robert Iger, the CEO of Disney, who owns ABC, won a bet with the CEO of NBC, Steve Burke, and had to switch news anchors for a day, “as a goof.”
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“Whoever Takes Pictures Of Kittens In Human Clothes. I Love Those!:” A TDQ Q&A With Wally Lurz, Part 2

Wally Lurz: The Best

Wally Lurz receiving the presidential award for being The Best Photojournalist.

TDQ: Is there a photojournalist hierarchy? Is the ultimate goal to be in New York or DC working “for the network” filming Brian Williams or Diane Sawyer, or is the best work done in the trenches? 

Lurz: I’m the best. That’s all you need to know. There’s a hierarchy in terms of being cool and not being a douche. And, being a good shooter of course. As far as going to NY, LA, or CHI it’s basically a preference. Finding the right fit for what you like and what you wanna do. I know people who’ve gone to bigger markets and those that have gone to smaller ones, as well as people that have gone into film or production of some sort. Then there are those that have gotten out completely. There’s a pretty big turnover rate in television. I know as many people in TV as I do that have gotten out. Overall it just depends on your talent, goals, determination and a lot of patience. It can be difficult to get a job in the big cities because they’re usually union shops and the guys in those jobs stay there ‘til they die. You do seem to have a little more control of your product in the trenches though. Which is nice.

TDQ: What’s a typical work day like for you in South Florida news?

Lurz: Take the best sex you’ve ever had, add it with winning the lottery, and you’re nowhere near it…really. You’re nowhere near it. Continue reading