“I Became Frustrated With The Traditional Voice Teaching Approaches:” A TDQ Q&A With Voice Coach To The Stars Gary Catona

Gary Catona

Come take Gary Catona’s hand and he will take you to a place where your voice is much improved.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with voice coach Gary Catona. Gary spoke to us about his eclectic list of clients, how he became a voice coach and how you can build your ultimate voice. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with voice coach Gary Catona:
 
The Daily Quarterly: Who was your favorite singer growing up and why?
 
Gary Catona: My favorite singer and inspiration was Mario Lanza – the Andrea Bocelli of his day. From my own city Philadelphia, Lanza captivated me with the beauty, energy, and emotion of his voice – still, in my view, the greatest voice America has ever produced and in the top 5 of all time.
 
TDQ: How did you start your career as a voice coach?
 
GC: I became frustrated with the traditional voice teaching approaches and ended up formulating my own system of voice building and realized the revolutionary nature of my system and decided to teach it to the world.
 
Gary Catona and Stevie Wonder

Gary Catona and client Stevie Wonder.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Be honest with your self.
 
TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?
 
GC: Go for the money.
 
TDQ: Who are your influences?
 
GC: Enrico Caruso, Friedrich Nietzsche, Muhammad Ali, Shirley MacLaine, Leonardo Da Vinci and many other mentors along the way.
 
Gary Catona and Muhammed Ali

Gary Catona and client Muhammed Ali.

TDQ: Besides singers like Whitney Houston and Steven Tyler, you’ve also worked with boxer Muhammad Ali. What were the different challenges working with someone like that who isn’t a singer? What did you teach him?
 
GC: Ali had a good musical ear so he was able to follow my instruction well. I built back a large percentage of his speaking voice, which was becoming very weak. We worked and traveled together – a monumental episode of my life. There are no real challenges with working with non singers – even pitch issues are not a big deal. 
 
TDQ: Besides talking too much or singing too loudly, what are common everyday things most people do that they wouldn’t think could damage their voice?
 
GC: Talking too much on cell phones while driving or in a loud environment. This causes the person to “compete” – mostly unconsciously – with ambient noise, which could, over time, be harmful.
 
TDQ: Have you ever encountered a client whose voice is just too far gone, or can anybody’s voice be saved or repaired with the proper therapy and work?
 
GC: I have had some voice cases which were too neurologically damaged to help. 
 
Gary Catona's Ultimate Voice Builder

Gary Catona’s Ultimate Voice Builder.

TDQ: Tell us about the Ultimate Voice Builder DVD and why people should grab a copy?
 
GC: Getting the UVB DVD is like having a great cookbook from a famous chef – follow the directions and the results will be excellent. This product is for anyone who would like a much stronger, more attractive singing or speaking voice with increased richness and range. Who doesn’t want that?!
 
Check out Gary’s website and follow him on Twitter.

“At The End Of The Day, It’s A Relatable Record That Makes Women FEEL:” A TDQ Q&A With Singer-Songwriter Carly Robyn Green

Carly Robyn GreenThis week’s Q&A is with Carly Robyn Green. The Philly native talked with us about how the music scene from her hometown compares to LA, about her upcoming record and a life-changing conversation with Cee Lo Green (no relation). Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with singer-songwriter Carly Robyn Green:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Carly Robyn Green: I can’t pin-point a specific moment or event that made me want to be in the music business, but I’ve known since I was seven years old!

I remember a second grade homework assignment to create a personal business card featuring what I wanted to “be” when I grew up. I designed a hot pink business card that said “C.G. The Singer!” This was before I officially began singing… But, I always had a toy microphone in hand, since I could talk! I fell asleep listening to music, I made up lyrics and song titles as a kid, and I was always singing around the house, for my great-grandmother in the hospital, or for my family during holiday gatherings. So, when I created that hot pink business card that said “C.G. The Singer” – that’s when I knew I knew.

I’m sure I was influenced by car rides listening to the soft rock station, B101, with my mom in Philadelphia… And I must have been influenced by my dad’s obsession with Sinatra and The Beatles, and the silly songs he would make up and sing to me. Music has always had a powerful presence in my life, so I guess I have just always known it’s something I wanted to pursue professionally.

TDQ: Who was your favorite musical artist when you were a kid?

CRG: Streisand. It’s always been Streisand!

TDQ: What was your favorite album when you were a kid?

CRG: The first album I ever bought was Michael Bolton’s “Soul Provider” in 1989. I was six years old, and I loved “How Am I Supposed to Live Without You.” Haha. I also bought Whitney Houston’s first two records at that time – “Whitney Houston” and “Whitney.” My favorite overall albums were actually the Broadway concept albums of Jekyll & Hyde, The Scarlet Pimpernel, and Sunset Boulevard. I had no idea what the lyrics of these songs were about, but the sweeping melodies hooked me instantly.

(I also can’t deny my love affair with every New Kids on the Block album, too!)

TDQ: Who are your influences?

CRG: I have always been influenced by Natalie Cole, Celine Dion, Mariah Carey, Toni Braxton, Whitney Houston, Lara Fabian, Heart, Judy Garland, Carol King, Michael Bolton, Andrea Bocelli, Meatloaf, and Burt Bacharach… And my favorite is Streisand. I’ve always been most affected by those emotional, soaring ballads, by dramatic, sweeping orchestrations, and by artists with that touch of soulfulness that added meaning and honesty to their deliveries.
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Jennifer Love Hewitt, Garth Brooks To Star In Remake Of “The Bodyguard”

The Bodyguard

She promised herself she wouldn't fall in love.

Los Angeles—Warner Brothers announced yesterday that the long-anticipated remake of the 1992 Kevin Costner-Whitney Houston smash hit “The Bodyguard” will finally become a reality, this time with Jennifer Love Hewitt as the role of the bodyguard hired to protect singing star Garth Brooks’ character.

This version will focus more on technology like Twitter and Google Maps that makes the stalking of a celebrity much easier than when the first script was written in the mid-1970s, and even easier than when Costner and Houston’s version came out, the press release said.

Though it was unlikely that either Costner or Houston would be associated with the new incarnation, the recent death of the singer did have a hand in getting the remake back on track. Continue reading

New Whitney Houston Biography Says Singer Wished She’d Married Dexter Stuffins From “Silver Spoons” When She Had The Chance

Bodyguard: Why I Believe The Children Are The FutureLos Angeles—An upcoming biography by writer Martin Hazel says singer and actress(?) Whitney Houston has maintained for years that she missed the boat in not marrying Dexter Stuffins from “Silver Spoons” when they dated in the mid 1980s.

“She loves her daughter, make no mistake,” Hazel said, referring to the only child Houston had during her 14 year marriage to singer Bobby Brown. “But looking back, she said she obviously should have tried to work things out with Stuffins, who at the time was business manager for Edward Stratton III, owner of Eddie Toys, rather than let the relationship end.”
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