“Don’t Wait Around Waiting For Someone Else To Tell You It’s OK:” A TDQ Q&A With Filmmaker Tony Germinario

Tony Germinario

Bad Frank head writer and director Tony Germinario, center, on the set with cinematographer/editor Mike Hechanova, left, and assistant director Tommy Monahan, right.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with writer/producer/director Tony Germinario. Tony spoke to us about his latest film, “Bad Frank,” how many times he saw “Spaceballs” when it hit theaters and his career transition from musician to filmmaker. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Tony Germinario: 

The Daily Quarterly: How did you get into show business?

Tony Germinario: Although I was a movie buff for as long as I remember, I started off as a musician. When I went to college, I was a trombone player, but my neighbor was a bass player. I went to one of his gigs and saw all the girls staring at the band, and I started teaching myself to play the next day. I was a touring musician for a number of years once I got out of school, but as I got a little older and the band started getting married and having kids, I moved back to screenwriting. The first script I wrote was awful, the next one not quite as awful, and so on. Eventually, I was hired by Choice Skinner out in LA to write an indie screenplay. We hit it off so we did a couple of short films together and he directed a feature which I wrote. The rest is history.

TDQ: Who was your favorite director growing up?

TG: I’d have to say Scorcese was my favorite growing up. “Goodfellas” was one of the best films ever made. But Kevin Smith and Ed Burns are two of the directors I’ve grown to admire immensely. They make great films, write great dialog, do a lot with a little, and they’re both just cool, down-to-earth guys.

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

TG: That’s a loaded question. I saw “Spaceballs” three times in the first 24 hours it was out in theaters, so that’s gotta count for something. I also loved “Field of Dreams,” “Platoon” (there’s a story behind this), “Star Wars,” oh yeah, and “Teen Wolf.” I’ve got my reasons.

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?

TG: The best advice I ever got was just go do it. Don’t wait around waiting for someone else to tell you it’s OK.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you ever got?

TG: When I filmed a movie out in LA, I was told you gotta have this and you gotta have that. Utter bull s—.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

TG: Kevin Smith and Ed Burns are two of my influences on the film side. My father was the biggest influence I’ll ever have on the life side.

Bad FrankTDQ: Tell us about your latest project, “Bad Frank”

TG: “BAD FRANK” is about a guy who has impulse control disorder. He’s screwed up all his relationships with his family, friends, etc. He’s now married, and medicated, and he’s trying to repair all his relationships, but just as he does, his old boss comes back in the picture and all hell breaks loose.

TDQ: What project do you have up next?

TG: I’m working on a rape revenge story called “THE PRICE FOR SILENCE.” It stars Lynn Mancinelli who also starred in “BAD FRANK.” I didn’t want to stray too far from the tone of my last one, so if people liked Frank, I think they’ll like this one, too.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

TG: In five years, I see myself in the director’s chair on another script I wrote, hopefully with a little bit bigger budget. With plane tickets to Cannes and Sundance in my back pocket.

Check out Tony’s Facebook page and follow him on Twitter.

Bad Frank

Bad Frank has a great cast and is racking up award nominations and wins.

He Was A Goodfella: Henry Hill Dies At 69

Henry Hill

Henry Hill (center) met several times with actor Ray Liota (left) who played Hill in Goodfellas. Hill also consulted on the film RECOiL. This was to be the last meeting with RECOiL writer/director/actor/key grip Brian DiMaio, foiled by a faulty trunk latch.

Los Angeles—Maybe former mobster turned FBI stool pigeon Henry Hill died last Tuesday night in California. Maybe he didn’t. Things happen. He may have been 69, who knows? I ain’t sayin’ nothin’.

Born in —-, Hill could have been in the mob, but nobody really knows. Maybe he turned state’s evidence and testified against some former mob bosses, that sneaky rat. It’s possible there was some movie made about his life, who knows? People talk, things happen.
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