“We Must Present Our Rawest, Most Honest Selves, And Let Them Take It Or Leave It” A TDQ Q&A With Actress Pilar Holland

Pilar Holland

It’s Pilar Holland, everybody!

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with actress Pilar Holland. Pillar spoke to us about working on a bunch of Shonda Rhimes shows, her love of Shannen Doherty and her theater debut, “A Feminine Ending.” Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Pilar Holland:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to get into show business?

Pilar Holland: As a child, I didn’t know how to express myself. I had a huge emotional well and no outlet. I was very shy and couldn’t connect with people on a deeper level. I wanted the chance to learn how to do that. In college, when I realized that it was something I could actually do well, that’s when I knew it was my aspiration to explore life and all the different experiences that can be had and share those experiences with audiences. 

TDQ: Who was your favorite actress growing up?

PH: My favorite actress growing up was Shannen Doherty. There’s going to be a theme here. I was a HUGE fan of “Beverly Hills, 90210” and the movie “Heathers.”  

TDQ: What was your favorite TV show growing up?

PH: And here it is!! (drumroll) My favorite TV show growing up was “Beverly Hills, 90210.” I wanted to live in their world and that’s really what first piqued my interest in becoming an actress. I dreamt about living on that campus and wished I could create an alternate life and do so.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

PH: The best advice I have received was from my acting teacher Stuart Rogers—who taught me the distinction between being what we think a casting director wants, and what a casting director really needs. We must present our rawest, most honest selves, and let them take it or leave it. 

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

PH: One thing I remember a girlfriend telling me once was that if you don’t make it by the time you’re 22, you’re not going to make it at all. And that simply isn’t true. I always tell people you don’t become a doctor overnight. So, why should a career in the arts be any different? It takes time to build a career. You need training and experience.   

There is still time to see Pilar Holland in A Feminine Ending which is showing into early December.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

PH: I’ve always admired Cate Blanchett and over the past few years I’ve become a huge fan of Brie Larson’s career.  Some of the projects they choose have so much weight in social relevance and they have been able to create such empathic characters in their process.

TDQ: Tell us about working with ultra creator and show runner Shonda Rhimes on “Grey’s Anatomy” and “Scandal.”

PH: I actually haven’t had the opportunity to officially meet the woman behind it all. She does have final say on everything. So, I know she’s seen my work and continually hires me. Linda Lowy casts all of Shonda’s shows and they regularly bring me to audition for her projects. Once you’ve become a part of the Shonda Rhimes family, they really do bring you into the fold. One of my favorite acting moments thus far was working with director Tom Verica on the set of “Scandal.” He is one of my favorite directors I’ve worked with and I hope I get to do it again soon.

TDQ: You’ve also appeared on half hour sitcoms like “Young and Hungry” and “Happy Endings.” What’s the biggest difference between working on those and full hour-long dramas?

PH: Well, there’s a huge difference between multi-camera sitcoms and dramas. Those two shows you mentioned were actually single camera sitcoms and not that different from working on dramas, besides the content of course. On a multi-cam set you rehearse the show for four days prior to filming. The script is constantly being altered as the writers are seeing how jokes land and play out during the rehearsal process. Then when we do film, there are multiple cameras filming different angles at the same time versus on a single camera sitcom and drama, they only use one camera for filming. 

TDQ: What project(s) are you working on next?

PH: I’m starring in a play “A Feminine Ending” right now. It’s my theater debut! I’m very excited to share my art and the story with audiences. The subject is very timely and relevant. It’s about gender norms and the societal rules we are boxed and categorized into, and learning how to navigate outside of those boxes. We run through December 2nd, Friday and Saturday nights 8pm at Stuart Rogers Studios. We’ve already gotten a few rave reviews.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself and your career in five years?

PH: In five years, I see myself as the lead on my own television series. Hopefully with the opportunity to film indie movies in between seasons. That’s the game plan!

Pilar Holland Fashion

Sadly the topic of fashion never came up in this conversation. Pilar Holland’s style is both fun and accessible with an eye on repurposing the unexpected. We would say she even looks very stylish wearing nothing at all. Look at those cheek bones!


Be sure and follow Pilar on Twitter and  and like her Facebook page.

“There Is Such A Thrill In Hearing The Applause From The Audience:” A TDQ Q&A With Actor Evan Brinkman

Evan Brinkman

Evan Brinkman is a man of many talents including tying neckwear. He pre-tied all of the The Daily Quarterly editor’s neck ties so now we just have to carefully slip them on and off. No more clip-ons!

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with young up and coming actor Evan Brinkman. This talented junior high school student spoke with us about his love of acting, his support system and his time working with Judd Apatow on his upcoming film “Trainwreck.” Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with actor Evan Brinkman:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Evan Brinkman: Since the age of 6 years old I have participated in live theater, dance recitals and movies. I really have fun learning new character roles and interacting with other actors and there is such a thrill in hearing the applause from the audience. I enjoy the sense of accomplishment after a performance either on a live theater stage or in front of a movie camera.

TDQ: You’re from Orange Park, Florida. How long until you convince your parents to leave Florida for Hollywood?

EB: If the opportunity were to present itself that I needed to move to Hollywood for my acting career, then my family would be supportive. However, so many television shows and movies are filmed outside of Hollywood.

TDQ: What’s the best advice you’ve gotten?

EB: To stay the same kid that I am and to not get a big head.

TDQ: What’s the worst advice you’ve gotten?

EB: I don’t think I’ve had any yet.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

EB: My parents, who have been supportive and encouraged me to pursue my dreams. Also my acting coach, Cindy Hogan, who is my mentor.

Evan Brinkman

If we have our notes correct this is an old picture of Evan Brinkman, right, and Judd Apatow, left, both apparent sufferers of Benjamin Button disease. Wait, I am being told this is a recent picture of Evan Brinkman, left, and Judd Apatow, right. Neither have Benjamin Button disease.

TDQ: You are featured in Judd Apatow’s upcoming film, “Trainwreck.” How many of his other movies have your parents allowed you to watch?

EB: I have only watched the food poisoning scene from “Bridesmaids” and the chest waxing scene from “40 Year-Old Virgin.”

TDQ: What can you tell us about your character in “Trainwreck?”

EB: My character’s name is Allister who is the nephew of Amy Schumer. Mike Birbiglia is my father and Brie Larson is my stepmom.

TDQ: What was your experience like working with Amy Schumer and Bill Hader and with Judd Apatow?

EB: I felt privileged to work along side them. Amy and Bill were hysterical and joked on and off camera. Judd also is very funny with a great sense of humor.

TDQ: What project are you working on right now?

EB: Finishing 7th grade at my public Jr. High School. Then this summer I have a lead role in an independent movie called “Castle in the Woods.” It films in Georgia during July.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

EB: Hopefully with a lead role in a television series and many more acting credits to my name.

Check out more about Evan at his Facebook page. Continue reading