“We Realized The Potential In The Mobile Adult Entertainment:” A TDQ Q&A With Entrepreneur Rene Pour

Rene Pour: Futurist, Innovator

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with entrepreneur Rene Pour. Rene spoke to us about his influence, what the app design scene is like in his native Slovakia, and his adult virtual reality site, REALITY LOVERS, Here is this week’s NSFW TDQ Q&A with Rene Pour:

The Daily Quarterly: You grew up in Slovakia. What’s the climate like there for entrepreneurs and app designers? 

Rene Pour: My company, operating in the affiliate marketing business, was built up in Slovakia and I am living there, and Reality Lovers is UK based. The climate in Slovakia is like in every other country, you have to deal with the same issues and topics, some of them may be slightly different, but the nature of managing a company and administration is the same as in other EU countries. One of the biggest challenges is finding good developers and people for technical positions.

TDQ: When did you know you wanted to be an entrepreneur?

RP: This was a longer process in my professional life, and as I was working in  telecommunication services and mobile internet services, I found out that there was some space and a possibility within the mobile affiliate network business. I took the chance and started working on it. The basic idea was to do business with a small team of people. However, this changed when we realized the potential in the mobile adult entertainment. To be a good entrepreneur, I think you need to have visions, ideas and a good feeling for business, the mindset of “this is something I know, something I can put together”.

TDQ: What is the best advice you have ever gotten?

RP: “The meaning of life is to be stronger!” If you really take it to heart, being stronger can help you in a lot of situations.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you have ever gotten?

RP: I have never received bad advice.  Even if you think you got a bad piece of advice, you can still learn from it. In the end, any advice is good!

Rene Pour

Rene Pour: Awarded for work in his field.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

RP: I do not have one specific person who influences me, it´s more situation-based. I am inspired by how people face(d) different situations, like Steve Jobs’ active return to Apple or how a young person like the F1 Racing Driver Sebastian Vettel can put so much focus and passion into his work. Another good example is the Austrian owner of Red Bull and his story of how he has built up and manages the Energy Drink Empire. I am more influenced by stories such as these.

TDQ: Tell us about your virtual reality entertainment site “REALITY LOVERS”

RP: RealityLovers.com was launched in May, 2016. I dare to say that the videos we currently produce are top-notch in terms of technology and content. We are continuously improving and adapt to the latest trends and technical possibilities. Recently, we have started shooting from two angles – POV and Voyeur. To make our customers happy, we have weekly updates (two updates per week) with new movies and furthermore, we are launching two more niche-sites with VR content, focusing on MILF and Tranny Lovers. With RealityLovers.com, we want to give our users a completely new feeling of watching porn, they should feel like they are in the middle of action, directly in the scene. To bring users closer to porn-stars and  provide them with more fantasy, entertainment and pleasure  compared to just watching 2D porn. We got into a very interesting, new situation during a porn conference in Berlin, where our female customers were complaining that we have not enough female-focused movies on the site. VR made porn interesting for women and opened a new target group for us! A woman also wants to be made happy by men! With RealityLovers.com, we are offering cutting-edge adult entertainment.

Rene Pour: Reality Lovers

Some technophobes think virtual reality is isolating. The actual reality of virtual reality is that it can bring real people together.

TDQ: How did you get into the VR and porn genre?

RP: The idea behind the company’s involvement in virtual reality was born during the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona in 2014 where the technology had been presented by major mobile industry players.

Our team’s focus on mobile technologies naturally leads us to continuously seek new, innovative products to diversify the portfolio of company services, which is why the business of virtual reality immediately caught our interest. After researching the specific possibilities in the adult entertainment vertical, we were convinced that VR would play an incredibly important role as a new medium and would have an enormous potential due to a deeper connection with people’s hearts and imaginations. We also believed that VR content would not focus solely on video games and conference calls as some people seemed to think. The market in the adult vertical was quite new and open, and we saw a huge opportunity to enter.  

We can say that again, as it already happened in the past, it was porn that moved the needle to bring the VR closer to the masses. Within a few years, the market has evolved to offer an amazing array of high-quality entertainment filmed with the newest VR camera technology. There are several key players on the US and European markets that exclusively produce erotic content in VR, following the goal of putting viewers in the middle of the action instead of behind it and providing immersive, truly emotional experiences.

Reality Lovers went live in May 2016 and within a year accomplished a few milestones including winning a Venus Award for the Most Innovative Product.

TDQ: What project are you working on next?

RP: It´s a secret ;-)! In general, we are focused on producing more and better content, and currently, we are working on our own green room studio, which will enable us to work with the background of the scene. The user can choose the location he/she wants the scene to take place. Further, we are working to move the viewer from the passively watching position deeper into the real virtual reality world. The customer should be able to actively react and make decisions based on the situations in the scene and their body should also be able to feel what is happening there.  

TDQ: Where do you see yourself and Reality Lovers in five years?

RP: I see us following our target to be one of the leading brands for adult VR entertainment. VR and Mixed Reality will be main drivers in the sex industry, giving much bigger possibilities to users, eventually coming close to a more interactive virtual sex experience. With RealityLovers.com, we want to offer our customers maximum quality and the best entertainment, also in combination with active sex tools. Personally, I don´t want to replace normal sex between people, which is simply irreplaceable! However, by diving into the world of virtual sex and their possibilities within, we want to provide more entertainment, pleasure and fulfill the desires of adult online consumers.

Neglectful Parent, Toy Company Executive John Heard Dies At 71

John Heard

John Heard, left, met RECOiL writer/director/actor Brian DiMaio, right, early in his career on the set of C.H.U.D. where DiMaio played the role of a C.H.U.D.

Palo Alto, CA— Actor John Heard, best known as the dad who left Macauley Culkin home alone in the film “Home Alone” died Friday. He was 71.

Besides being a textbook horrible parent in “Home Alone” as well as “Home Alone 2: Lost in New York,” he also appeared in such films as “Big,” as a cheating racquetball playing toy company executive “Cat People,” “RECOiL” and “My Fellow Americans.”

On TV, he appeared in such shows as “Dead Ahead: The Exxon Valdez Disaster,” “Perfect Murder, Perfect Town” and “The Lizzie Borden Chronicles.”

He was married and divorced three times, and has two surviving children. His son, Max, died last December. 

“Don’t Wait Around Waiting For Someone Else To Tell You It’s OK:” A TDQ Q&A With Filmmaker Tony Germinario

Tony Germinario

Bad Frank head writer and director Tony Germinario, center, on the set with cinematographer/editor Mike Hechanova, left, and assistant director Tommy Monahan, right.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with writer/producer/director Tony Germinario. Tony spoke to us about his latest film, “Bad Frank,” how many times he saw “Spaceballs” when it hit theaters and his career transition from musician to filmmaker. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Tony Germinario: 

The Daily Quarterly: How did you get into show business?

Tony Germinario: Although I was a movie buff for as long as I remember, I started off as a musician. When I went to college, I was a trombone player, but my neighbor was a bass player. I went to one of his gigs and saw all the girls staring at the band, and I started teaching myself to play the next day. I was a touring musician for a number of years once I got out of school, but as I got a little older and the band started getting married and having kids, I moved back to screenwriting. The first script I wrote was awful, the next one not quite as awful, and so on. Eventually, I was hired by Choice Skinner out in LA to write an indie screenplay. We hit it off so we did a couple of short films together and he directed a feature which I wrote. The rest is history.

TDQ: Who was your favorite director growing up?

TG: I’d have to say Scorcese was my favorite growing up. “Goodfellas” was one of the best films ever made. But Kevin Smith and Ed Burns are two of the directors I’ve grown to admire immensely. They make great films, write great dialog, do a lot with a little, and they’re both just cool, down-to-earth guys.

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

TG: That’s a loaded question. I saw “Spaceballs” three times in the first 24 hours it was out in theaters, so that’s gotta count for something. I also loved “Field of Dreams,” “Platoon” (there’s a story behind this), “Star Wars,” oh yeah, and “Teen Wolf.” I’ve got my reasons.

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?

TG: The best advice I ever got was just go do it. Don’t wait around waiting for someone else to tell you it’s OK.

TDQ: What is the worst advice you ever got?

TG: When I filmed a movie out in LA, I was told you gotta have this and you gotta have that. Utter bull s—.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

TG: Kevin Smith and Ed Burns are two of my influences on the film side. My father was the biggest influence I’ll ever have on the life side.

Bad FrankTDQ: Tell us about your latest project, “Bad Frank”

TG: “BAD FRANK” is about a guy who has impulse control disorder. He’s screwed up all his relationships with his family, friends, etc. He’s now married, and medicated, and he’s trying to repair all his relationships, but just as he does, his old boss comes back in the picture and all hell breaks loose.

TDQ: What project do you have up next?

TG: I’m working on a rape revenge story called “THE PRICE FOR SILENCE.” It stars Lynn Mancinelli who also starred in “BAD FRANK.” I didn’t want to stray too far from the tone of my last one, so if people liked Frank, I think they’ll like this one, too.

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

TG: In five years, I see myself in the director’s chair on another script I wrote, hopefully with a little bit bigger budget. With plane tickets to Cannes and Sundance in my back pocket.

Check out Tony’s Facebook page and follow him on Twitter.

Bad Frank

Bad Frank has a great cast and is racking up award nominations and wins.

Erich Mrak Releases New Music Video For “Think About It”

Toronto (ON)With 2017 almost at halfway point, our close personal Canadian friend Erich follows up his Earmark premiered January release, “Think About It” (available on all major streaming services, see below) with a music video. Shot in a POV style, the music video illustrates a day in the life of an unnamed character, and sheds light on their current overall life. With brief cameos from Erich and friends, the music video visually captures someone coping with unfortunate situations, and in-turn thinking about it. 

January Earmilk premiere : http://earmilk.com/2017/01/24/erich-mrak-wants-to-know-if-you-still-think-about-it-premiere

Link to “Think About It” Official Music Video : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JxycKRgjVBk

Links to “Think About It” (Audio) : 
https://soundcloud.com/erichmrakmusic/think-about-it
spotify:track:2eYJqm5OsXe9GmEhmDoJVF

http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1201730672?ls=1&app=itunes

Cover art done by Martin Nombrado.
(https://www.instagram.com/bra.deau/)
Photo’s taken by Emily Direnzo.
(https://www.instagram.com/edirenzo/

Contact for all inquiries (bookings, management, ect,) :
Erich – ErichMrakMusic@gmail.com
Blayne Stone (Bookings) – Caminojazzclub@gmail.com

You are now musically informed. Go and do likewise. 

“I Often Joke That I Eat Elephants For A Living:” A TDQ Q&A With Director Brad Douglas

Brad Douglas

Brad Douglas, living the dream. Wearing all the hats! No, not real hats. Read the article.

This week’s TDQ Q&A is with writer/director/producer Brad Douglas. Brad spoke to us about his latest project, “Bestment,” all the hats he wore while making it and the joys of making movies in Oregon. Here is this week’s TDQ Q&A with Brad Douglas:

The Daily Quarterly: What made you want to be in show business?

Brad Douglas: I grew up in small town Oregon with my grandparents. It was a pretty sleepy existence for a kid. I watched a lot of TV and movies and was enamoured by the medium. Spent some time doing back yard 8mm stuff and eventually video, but it has always been something that I love. Maybe because of the glamour of doing something you love for a living but mostly the process of creating.

TDQ: Who was your favorite writer/director growing up?

BD: I didn’t really pay a lot of attention to who wrote and directed films until I was in my late teens working at a video store. That was in the 80s so the regular suspects like Scorsese, Carpenter, Spielberg, etc. were prominent names that I associated good films with. I still don’t know if I have a favorite, but there are several that are damn good at what they do.

TDQ: What was your favorite movie growing up?

BD: I really loved “Saturday Night Fever” when it came out and also “Every Which Way But Loose” with that God-damned ape LOL. Then came “Star Wars”….need I say more?

TDQ: What was the best advice you ever got?

BD: My grandmother always told me to bite off more than you can chew and keep chewing. How relevant is that to the movie making world in a nut shell?

TDQ: What was the worst advice you ever got?

BD: I had some pretty negative Nellie’s in my family that told me I was foolish to think I could ever get into the business. If I would have stayed in that small town and listened to that s—, I probably never would have, but I didn’t and neither should anyone who believes in themselves.

TDQ: Who are your influences?

BD: That’s a great question that has many answers. I’ve looked at a lot of work from all types of directors over the years and for sure do have an influence on my creative. However, no one film maker is all 100% all good or all bad. For example, Spielberg teaches you to drive the movie with the story and the audience will forgive weaknesses, Lynch shows you how to mind screw your audience and not be ashamed that it makes no sense, Kevin Smith shoves a wild premise right down your throat (“Red State”) and like it. By learning successful elements from each you can essentially create a movie like a good soup. And everyone loves soup.

BradDouglas, <em>Besetment</em>

Look at how many times “Brad Douglas” appears in that credit block! That’s a lot of hats! No, not real hats. Read the article.

TDQ: Tell us about the latest movie you directed, “Besetment”

BD: I was living at a mountain resort in Oregon when I wrote it. It started out as a short but I just kept writing and pretty soon it was feature length. The story of an unemployed girl in a small town had a lot of relevance at the time. I had visited the town of Mitchell, Oregon earlier and decided I wanted to make a movie there so I intersected the two and ended up with “BESETMENT.” It’s a disturbing story that could very well be true I guess. I mean what’s really scary in life? Monsters or deranged people? I say the latter. I wrote the role of Mildred specifically for Marlyn Mason who in my opinion kills it! She took the movie to a whole other level. Abby Wathen came into my life on another film that fell apart so we were trying to do something else that summer and I just so happened to have the script on my shelf. She was a hell of a trooper through some pretty uncomfortable conditions. She was just what the role needed and I’m so glad she made me make this movie! I really enjoyed using a lot of characters along the way and a very diverse locations list. That’s the beauty of Oregon. Pick a location and write a movie around it rather that the opposite. There are many to choose from and you don’t need a back lot studio to do it. Plus the people are very welcoming of filmmaking, unlike a lot of Californians where they’re sick of it. And trust me, it’s not hard to get LA actors to spend a month in Oregon. It really is beautiful.

TDQ: You also wrote and produced “Bestement.” Did you find it a positive experience wearing so many hats on a project, or do you think it’s easier to just have one single role in making a film?

BD: I’m not going to lie, writing, producing and directing is an enormous amount of work but I did it out of necessity. Especially directing. I often joke that I eat elephants for a living and there’s a lot of truth to that. Thank God I had such a good cast so I could just concentrate on fundamentally shooting the film. I made some mistakes that I deserve to be pointed out for, but that’s what first films are for and I learned a ton. Near the end of fimling, Chuck Greenwood (DP) and I were really clicking and when we started the next film in December of this year we picked up right where we left off. Producing is super important and though I have a lot of support from my producing crew I am involved a lot. Pre-Production is crucial for principal to work. I haven’t written any more scripts mainly because I’m so busy in production. But it’s a love hate job. Maybe I’ll write the sequel to “Besement.” I think there’s enough there for it. Let’s see how the public likes the film before I lock myself in my head for a month LOL.

TDQ: What project are you working on next?

BD: I produced and directed a film in December called “Between the Trees,” written by Sam Klarreich, about a guy having relationship troubles taking his buddies up to a remote hunting cabin where they find out the real troubles are in the trees that surround them. It’s another twisted little flick. I am also in development on a script about the dark side of horse racing. Veteran writer, Michael Kane wrote it and Abby somehow got a hold of it and sent it to me. I have been racing thoroughbreds for most of my adult life so it seems like a good fit. It’s drama though, so we’ll see. Dramas scare me!

TDQ: Where do you see yourself in five years?

BD: Ha. Check with me in 5 days. Seriously, though I hope to knock out a couple films a year as long as we keep getting distribution and it pencils. The business changes so much year to year that it’s hard to see if this is going to be a viable endeavour and for how long. Let’s hope so because I’m having a blast.

Check out Brad’s Facebook page.